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Relatives of people who are presumed still buried beneath the rubble await news of rescue efforts in Mexico City on Tuesday. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images

The work built by French artist JR peers over the U.S.-Mexico border at Tecate, Calif., earlier this week. Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images

As Boy Peers Curiously Over Border Wall, His Artist Asks: 'What Is He Thinking?'

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A forecast map from the National Hurricane Center shows the path of Franklin, which made landfall as a hurricane on eastern Mexico's coast early Thursday. National Hurricane Center hide caption

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National Hurricane Center

Fishermen move their boats, normally moored in the Gulf of Mexico, onto a coastal road to protect them ahead of the arrival of Tropical Storm Franklin, in the port city of Veracruz, Mexico, on Wednesday. Felix Marquez/AP hide caption

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Felix Marquez/AP

Gabriel Zepeda (right) makes an all-terrain wheelchair. He's been making wheelchairs for low-income Mexicans for 27 years. Mónica Ortiz Uribe for NPR hide caption

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Mónica Ortiz Uribe for NPR

Mexico And U.S. Team Up To Create Low-Cost Wheelchairs

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Archaeologists working at the Templo Mayor site of Aztec ruins in Mexico City, in August 2015. Scientists say the remains of women and children are among those found at a main trophy rack of human skulls, known as "tzompantli." Hector Montano/AP hide caption

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Hector Montano/AP

Bartender Robin Miller mixes a round of mezcal margaritas at Espita Mezcaleria in Washington, D.C. As U.S. drinkers embrace mezcal, investors are flocking south to the heart of Mexico's mezcal country, and local incomes are rising. Kevin Leahy/NPR hide caption

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Kevin Leahy/NPR

America's Growing Taste For Mezcal Is Good For Mexico's Small Producers

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Jorge Santiago Aguirre, a human rights lawyer in Mexico City, clicked on a link in a text message he received last year asking for his help. Nothing happened. But days later, audio was leaked of a call between Aguirre and one of his clients. The call had been heavily edited and painted both men as criminals. James Frederick hide caption

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James Frederick

Mexico's Government Is Accused Of Targeting Journalists And Activists With Spyware

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Miguel Angel Covarrubias Cervantes, a former mayor in central Mexico, posted a video of him delivering a speech inspired by a Netflix promotional video for House of Cards. Miguel Cervantes/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Miguel Cervantes/Screenshot by NPR

Orlando, whose nickname is the Wolf, is a human smuggler in Matamoros who says far fewer people want to employ his services and jump the border, with the Trump administration. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Illegal Border Crossings Are Down, And So Is Business For Smugglers

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