Prison Prison

Inmates walk past correctional officers at the Washington Corrections Center in Shelton, Wash., on Feb. 17, 2011. Gov. Jay Inslee said last month that more than 3,000 prisoners in Washington have been mistakenly released early since 2002 because of an error by the state's Department of Corrections. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Elaine Thompson/AP

2 Prisoners Mistakenly Released Early Now Charged In Killings

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/461700642/461723197" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

David Carlson served two tours in Iraq while in the military. Courtesy of David Carlson hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of David Carlson

Behind Bars, Vets With PTSD Face A New War Zone, With Little Support

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/454292031/454907679" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Leahya Ellis and other spinning class participants use exercise as a way to shake away stress, anger and depression. Bastiaan Slabbers for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Bastiaan Slabbers for NPR

Biking Behind Bars: Female Inmates Battle Weight Gain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/444526183/447688122" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former Peanut Corporation of America President Stewart Parnell was sentenced to 28 years in prison for knowingly shipping salmonella-tainted peanut butter, which was linked to the deaths of nine people. Don Petersen/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Don Petersen/AP

Inmates talk with professors about how to teach classes in the Inside-Out program, where half the students are prisoners and half are traditional college students. Gabrielle Emanuel/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Gabrielle Emanuel/NPR

Inside-Out: Where Campus Life Meets Prison Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/428984593/440327681" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New York Begins To Question Solitary Confinement As Default

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/432622699/434088441" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A part of Eastern State Penitentiary in Philadelphia is shown in 2008. The penitentiary opened in 1829, closed in 1971, and then historic preservationists reopened it to the public for tours in 1994. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Rourke/AP

How Solitary Confinement Became Hardwired In U.S. Prisons

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/432622096/433981083" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Curtis Carroll — also known as "Wall Street" — teaches prisoners at San Quentin State Prison about stocks. The Kitchen Sisters hide caption

toggle caption
The Kitchen Sisters

Inmate With Stock Tips Wants To Be San Quentin's Warren Buffett

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/431958714/432192433" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Obama visited the El Reno Federal Correctional Institution in El Reno, Okla., on Thursday as part of a weeklong focus on inequities in the criminal justice system. While there, he met with non-violent drug offenders. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

'Driving Straight,' Giving Back: Rebuilding A Life After Prison

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/424301365/424342002" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Is Obama Finally Becoming The President African-Americans Wanted?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/423740596/423740597" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mary Johnson-Roy spoke with Oshea Israel at StoryCorps in Minneapolis. StoryCorps hide caption

toggle caption
StoryCorps

At The End Of A Murder Sentence, A Redemption Forged From Forgiveness

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/423549790/423740654" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript