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Ichard Oden works at an apartment complex under construction in Westland, Mich. Elaine Cromie for NPR hide caption

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Elaine Cromie for NPR

Former Inmates Are Getting Jobs As Employers Ignore Stigma In Bright Economy

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A corrections officer walks the grounds of the Idaho State Correctional Institution south of Boise where Adree Edmo was incarcerated. Heath Druzin/Boise State Public Radio hide caption

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Heath Druzin/Boise State Public Radio

Court To Rule On Sex Reassignment Surgery For Idaho Inmate

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Prisoners stand in a crowded lunch line at Elmore Correctional Facility in Elmore, Ala. in June 2015. On Saturday, a U.S. District Court Judge determined the state's Department of Corrections had not adequately addressed a spike in prisoner suicides. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

Prisoners stand in a crowded lunch line during a prison tour at Elmore Correctional Facility in Elmore, Ala. A Department of Justice report finds violence in Alabama's overcrowded prisons is 'cruel' and 'pervasive.' Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

Justice Dept. Finds Violence In Alabama Prisons 'Common, Cruel, Pervasive'

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Qieer Wang for NPR

He Was Imprisoned And Losing His Mind. 'Anna Karenina' Saved Him

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The Joliet Treatment Center, southwest of Chicago, is one of four facilities now providing mental health care to some of Illinois' sickest inmates. It's a start, say mental health advocates, but many more inmates in Illinois and across the U.S. still await treatment. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

Jason Jones (left) with his roommates Joe Klein and Tamiko Panzella in their Oakland, Calif., apartment. Panzella and Klein are participating in a new program to provide housing to former inmates. Jones was released recently after nearly 14 years in prison. Courtesy of Tamiko Panzella hide caption

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Courtesy of Tamiko Panzella

From A Cell To A Home: Newly Released Inmates Matched With Welcoming Hosts

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Exonerated after 16 years in prison, Kristine Bunch ate a celebratory meal of scallops, cheese grits, a platter of hummus and vegetables, and champagne. It was a meal that became the first image by artist Julie Green in her series "First Meal," a project supported by the Oregon State University Center for the Humanities. (Paintings are 4 feet by 3 feet, acrylic on Tyvek.) Julie Green/Courtesy of Julie Green and Upfor Gallery hide caption

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Julie Green/Courtesy of Julie Green and Upfor Gallery

An Australian flag flies outside Bandyup Women's Prison where a woman was forced to give birth alone in a locked prison cell despite pleading for help for more than an hour, according to a newly released report. Paul Kane/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Kane/Getty Images

Keri Blakinger spent nearly two years incarcerated on narcotics charges before becoming a criminal justice reporter for the Houston Chronicle. Nicole Hensley/Houston Chronicle hide caption

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Nicole Hensley/Houston Chronicle

From Convict To Criminal Justice Reporter: 'I Was So Lucky To Come Out Of This'

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Daidre Kimp dresses her daughter, Stella, before starting their day. Stella will go to in-prison daycare, while her mom does chores at the Washington Corrections Center for Women in Gig Harbor. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

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Eman Mohammed for NPR

Federal Legislation Seeks Ban On Shackling Of Pregnant Inmates

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The Donggala District Prison was torched by rioting prisoners one day after the double earthquake and tsunami disasters on Sept. 28. Donggala is close to the epicenter of the earthquake, and rattled prisoners wanted a way out. Noele Mage/NPR hide caption

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Noele Mage/NPR

Why Inmates Set Free After The Indonesia Quake Are Returning To Their Prison

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