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Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, will lead the Senate Finance Committee's questioning Tuesday of executives from pharmacy benefit managers about drug costs. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Drug Industry Middlemen To Be Questioned By Senate Committee

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Surprise bills happen when patients go to a hospital they think is in their insurance network but are seen by doctors or specialists who aren't. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

After a sports injury, Esteban Serrano owed $829.41 for a knee brace purchased with insurance through his doctor's office. He says he found the same kind of brace selling for less than $250 online. Paula Andalo/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Paula Andalo/Kaiser Health News

Soccer-Playing Engineer Calls Foul On Pricey Knee Brace

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The new strategy of some health plans for state employees is to pay hospitals a certain percentage above the basic Medicare reimbursement rate. It allows hospitals a small profit, the states say, while reducing costs to states and patients. shapecharge/Getty Images hide caption

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shapecharge/Getty Images

Anna Lange, who works for the sheriff's office in Houston County, Ga., discovered that her health insurance plan excludes transgender services. She is seeking to challenge that policy. Audra Melton for NPR hide caption

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Audra Melton for NPR

One health insurance startup charges patients extra for procedures not covered by their basic health plan. The out-of-pocket cost for a tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy might range from $900 to $3,000 extra, while a lumbar spine fusion could range from $5,000 to $10,000. Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration suggests consumers who get prescription drugs mailed to them via CanaRx are at risk of getting mislabeled or counterfeit drugs. But consumer watchdog groups say the FDA has supplied no evidence that's happened. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

The proposed legislation aims to reduce patients' costs by beefing up a Texas Department of Insurance program that scrutinizes surprise balance bills greater than $500 from any emergency health care provider. Kameleon007/Getty Images hide caption

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Kameleon007/Getty Images

Jeannette Parker, an animal-loving biologist, stopped to feed a stray cat in a rural area outside Florida's Everglades National Park. Instead of showing appreciation, the cat bit her. Angel Valentín for KHN hide caption

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Angel Valentín for KHN

Cat Bites The Hand That Feeds; Hospital Bills $48,512

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Leah Steimel (center) says she would consider buying insurance through a Medicaid-style plan that the New Mexico Legislature is considering. Her family includes (from left) her husband, Wellington Guzman; their daughter, Amelia; and sons Daniel and Jonathan. Courtesy of Leah Steimel hide caption

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Courtesy of Leah Steimel

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson announces changes to the state Medicaid program called Arkansas Works, including the addition of a work requirement for certain beneficiaries, on March 6, 2017. Michael Hibblen/KUAR hide caption

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Michael Hibblen/KUAR

In Arkansas, Thousands Of People Have Lost Medicaid Coverage Over New Work Rule

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Republican lawmaker Allen Christensen is pushing a bill in the Utah Senate that would shrink the Medicaid expansion his state's voters approved. "They are not obligated to balance the budget," he argues. "We are." Cory Dinter/KUER hide caption

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Cory Dinter/KUER

Utah Voters Approved Medicaid Expansion, But State Lawmakers Are Balking

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Austin, Texas, dentist Brad Buckingham received a bill for more than $70,000 after a bike accident landed him in the hospital and he needed emergency hip surgery. Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT hide caption

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Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., at an Oakland, Calif., campaign rally this week. Harris says she backs a single-payer health system, but she hasn't yet offered details on how she would finance that plan. Mason Trinca/Getty Images hide caption

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Mason Trinca/Getty Images

Anthem Blue Cross of California, one of the state's largest health insurers, is battling Sutter Health over how much it should pay the company's 24 hospitals and 5,000 doctors in Northern California to care for tens of thousands of patients. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Demonstrators affiliated with the National Air Traffic Controllers Association protested the federal shutdown at a Capitol Hill rally earlier this month in Washington, D.C. Alex Wroblewski/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wroblewski/Bloomberg/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a speech Thursday to the new Congress that Democrats want "to lower health care costs and prescription drug prices and protect people with pre-existing medical conditions." Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Democrats' Health Care Ambitions Meet The Reality Of Divided Government

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Robert and Tiffany Cano of San Tan Valley, Ariz., have a new marriage, a new house and a 10-month-old son, Brody. Since Brody was born, the Canos have racked up nearly $12,000 in medical debt. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Terry Mote (right) visits the home of Stanley and Lorit Jamor in Enid, Okla. Stanley was born on Bikini atoll, and is a descendant of Chief Juda, who was told in 1946 by Commodore Ben H. Wyatt, of the U.S. Navy, to give up the island homeland "for the good of all mankind." Bikini was a main site for U.S. nuclear testing and is uninhabitable to this day because of radioactive contamination. Sarah Craig for NPR hide caption

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Sarah Craig for NPR

A Policy Knot Leaves Oklahomans From Marshall Islands Struggling To Get Health Care

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Philadelphia demonstrators protested earlier moves by Republicans to repeal the Affordable Care Act last February. If the ACA is indeed axed as unconstitutional, health policy analysts say, millions of people could lose health coverage, and many aspects of Medicare and Medicaid would change dramatically. Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images