Health Insurance Health Insurance

The health insurance company Anthem has introduced a policy discouraging patients from "avoidable" emergency room visits. Patients and doctors are pushing back against the program. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

California is starting to push hospitals throughout the state to lower their rates of medically unnecessary C-sections. Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images hide caption

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Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images

Not seeing clearly can hamper a child's academic achievement, social development and long-term health, research shows. The right pair of glasses can make a big difference. FatCamera/Getty Images hide caption

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FatCamera/Getty Images

Eleven days after surgery on her shoulder and foot, Sherry Young of Lawton, Okla., got a letter from her insurance plan saying that it hadn't approved her hospital stay. The letter "put me in a panic," says Young. The $115,000-plus bill for the hospital stay was about how much Young's home is worth, and five times her annual income. Nick Oxford for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Nick Oxford for Kaiser Health News

Sticker Shock Jolts Oklahoma Patient: $15,076 For 4 Tiny Screws

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Patients with private insurance like the drug coupons because they can help make specialty medicines more affordable. But health care analysts say the coupons may also discourage patients from considering appropriate lower-cost alternatives, including generic drugs. DNY59/Getty Images hide caption

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DNY59/Getty Images

The House bill calls for $65 million in loans and grants, administered by the USDA, to establish "association-style" health plans that likely wouldn't have to cover hospitalization, prescription drugs or emergency care. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Under the Affordable Care Act, many insurance plans are required to cover a range of essential services, such as hospitalization and prescription drugs. But reimbursement for certain medical equipment — such as crutches or a leg boot after an injury — varies widely from plan to plan. tirc83/Getty Images hide caption

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tirc83/Getty Images

The new exemptions will mostly apply to penalty payments tied to 2018 taxes and to the previous two years. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

Under current law, Medicare requires patients to get a referral before seeing an audiologist to diagnose hearing loss. Leyla B / EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Leyla B / EyeEm/Getty Images

On March 21, 2010, Rep. Bart Stupak (D-Mich.), alongside fellow anti-abortion Democrats, holds up a copy of an executive order from President Barack Obama guaranteeing no federal funding for abortion. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Idaho Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter says Thursday's letter from the Trump administration "was not a rejection of our approach," but rather an invitation to keep talking about how to make Idaho's state-based health plans pass muster. Otto Kitsinger/AP hide caption

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Otto Kitsinger/AP

Health insurer Cigna is looking to increase its muscle by buying Express Scripts, a leading manager of prescription benefits. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Health Insurer Cigna To Pay $67 Billion For Express Scripts

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Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar faced questions Wednesday from the House Ways and Means Committee about Idaho's move. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP