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Juana Rivera (left) speaks with agent Fabrizzio Russi about buying insurance through the Affordable Care Act in Miami in 2014. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Rep. Tom Price has introduced his own alternative to the Affordable Care Act four times. The legislation provides an idea of how he might lead the Department of Health And Human Services. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

5 Things To Know About Rep. Tom Price's Health Care Ideas

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Keely Edgington and her daughter, Lula, pose inside their family-owned restaurant, Julep, in Kansas City, Mo. Lula was diagnosed with a neuroblastoma when she was 9 months old. She's now 16 months old. Alex Smith / KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith / KCUR

Worries About Health Insurance Cross Political Boundaries

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In 2015, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence announced that the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services had approved the state's waiver to try a different approach for Medicaid. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., discussed a Republican alternative to Obamacare upon its release at the American Enterprise Institute in June. Allison Shelley/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Shelley/Getty Images

If Republicans Repeal Obamacare, Ryan Has Replacement Blueprint

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To keep health insurance solvent, the pool of covered people needs to include the well and the sick. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Major changes to individual health coverage provided through the Obamacare marketplaces won't happen overnight. PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images

If the Trump administration decides to drop an appeal of a legal setback involving Obamacare subsidies, the insurance exchanges could be hobbled. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

President-elect Donald Trump has consistently promised to repeal Obamacare. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Can Kill Obamacare With Or Without Help From Congress

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A recent study from the University of Southern California found that prices charged by hospitals in the Sutter Health system are about 25 percent higher than those of other hospitals in California. Ken James/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ken James/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Big Hospital Network Cracks Down On The Right To Sue

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Enrollment for insurance through the Affordable Care Act runs from Nov. 1 to Dec. 15 for plans that start on Jan. 1, 2017. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Shopping For Obamacare Opens To Mixed Reviews From Consumers

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A federal law that aims to put insurance coverage of mental health care on equal footing with physical health care hasn't succeeded fully. James Boast/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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James Boast/Ikon Images/Getty Images