Health Insurance Health Insurance
Stories About

Health Insurance

The Trump administration said Thursday it wants states to innovate in ways that could produce more lower-cost health insurance options — even if those alternatives do not provide the same level of financial or medical coverage as an ACA plan. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

The number of children in the United States without health insurance jumped to 3.9 million in 2017 from about 3.6 million the year before, according to census data. Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images

Affordable Care Act navigator Nini Hadwen (right) helped Jorge Hernandez (left) and Marta Aguirre find a plan on the health insurance exchange in Miami in 2013. Today, with fewer navigators, much of that counseling is done by phone instead of in person. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Shereese Hickson was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2012 and is unable to work. She supports herself and her son, Isaiah, on $770 a month. Shane Wynn for KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Shane Wynn for KHN

Chronically Ill, Traumatically Billed: $123,019 For 2 Multiple Sclerosis Treatments

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/668663222/671285344" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More than half of all counties in the 39 states that rely on the federal HealthCare.gov exchange for ACA health insurance are experiencing a 10 percent price decrease, on average, for their cheapest plan for 2019. Patrick Sison/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Sison/AP

Many Who Buy ACA Health Plans For 2019 Find Lower Prices And More Choice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/667466242/670373335" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Klute-Nelson takes a break with her dogs Kona (left) and Max. Morgan Walker for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Morgan Walker for NPR

As Insurers Offer Discounts For Fitness Trackers, Wearers Should Step With Caution

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/668266197/669145286" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amanda Cahill, a supporter of Montana's tobacco tax measure, I-185, at a press conference near the state capitol last August. Tobacco firms have spent $17 million in opposition to the initiative, compared to an $8 million campaign by those in favor of it. Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio

Big Tobacco Spends Big To Block A Tax And Medicaid Expansion In Montana

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/662176822/664103276" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Open enrollment for 2019 health plans begins Nov. 1 on HealthCare.gov and on most state insurance exchanges. Healthcare.gov via Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Healthcare.gov via Screenshot by NPR

Looking For ACA Health Insurance For 2019? Here's What To Expect

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/662186774/662696822" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Organizers with Idahoans for Healthcare have been driving this green vehicle around the state to campaign for Medicaid expansion. Phil Galewitz/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Phil Galewitz/Kaiser Health News

As Sen. Joe Manchin, a Democrat from West Virginia, campaigns for re-election, he has warned that 800,000 West Virginians with pre-existing conditions could lose health coverage. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Marilyn Bartlett spent two years running Montana's employee health plan. She made better deals with hospitals and drug benefits managers and saved the plan from bankruptcy. Mike Albans for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Albans for NPR

A Tough Negotiator Proves Employers Can Bargain Down Health Care Prices

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/652312831/653570104" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Because of a recent court decision, the size of the financial incentive your employer offers you in hopes of motivating you to lower your cholesterol or lose weight may soon shrink. Molly Cranna/Refinery29/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Molly Cranna/Refinery29/Getty Images

Health insurers who offer Medicare Advantage plans have permission to soon require patients to try less expensive alternatives to some before receiving pricier drugs. Witthaya Prasongsin/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Witthaya Prasongsin/Getty Images

The total bill for Drew Calver's four-day hospital stay at St. David's Medical Center in April 2017 was $164,941. His insurer paid $55,840, leaving Calver responsible for the unpaid balance of $108,951.31. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Callie Richmond/KHN