Health Insurance Health Insurance

At Gerald Chinchar's home in San Diego, Calif., Nurse Sheri Juan (right) checks his arm for edema that might be a sign that his congestive heart failure is getting worse. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

For Some, Pre-Hospice Care Can Be A Good Alternative To Hospitals

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As Trump And Congress Flip-Flop On Health Care, Insurers Try To Plan Ahead

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Prescription drug coverage is one benefit that drives up insurance costs, and one that is very popular with consumers. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

In two recent clinical trials of Harvoni and Sovaldi in the treatment of young people between the ages of 12 and 17, the drugs eliminated all traces of the hepatitis C virus in 97 to 100 percent of patients, generally in 12 weeks. Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Carl Goulden, of Littlestown Pa., developed hepatitis B 10 years ago. Soon his health insurance premiums soared beyond a price he and his wife could afford. Elana Gordon/WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon/WHYY

U.S. Health Care Wrestles With The 'Pre-Existing Condition'

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The Trump administration is proposing changes to Obamacare that the White House says should stabilize the insurance marketplace. But critics of the proposal see big bumps ahead for consumers. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Members of Congress and their staffs seeking health insurance this year could choose from among 57 gold plans (from four insurers) sold on D.C.'s small business marketplace. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Though they failed to mobilize Congress to repeal the Affordable Care Act last month, Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) (right), Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and the White House could still undercut the insurance exchanges, reduce Medicaid benefits and let states limit coverage of birth control or prenatal visits. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Celeste Thompson, 57, a home care worker in Missoula, Mont., examines a pill bottle in her home. Thompson cares for her husband, and worries that if she loses her Medicaid coverage she won't be able to afford to see a doctor. Mike Albans for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Mike Albans for Kaiser Health News

U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price speaks during the White House daily press briefing March 7, 2017 at the White House in Washington, DC. Secretary Price answered questions on the new healthcare bill during the briefing. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, says the latest version of the GOP bill would let states decide on required benefits. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP