Health Insurance Health Insurance
Stories About

Health Insurance

Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Will My High Premiums Go Down? More Q&A About The GOP Health Plan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/534906065/535059295" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Patients who underwent genetic screenings now fear that documentation of the results in their medical records could lead to problems if a new health law is enacted. Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images

The ongoing debate over health care has many people wondering how changes will affect their coverage. Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images

Q&A: What Does The Senate Health Bill Mean For Me?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/534576392/534597262" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Medicaid pays the costs for about 62 percent of seniors who are living in nursing homes, some of the priciest health care available. Tomas Rodriguez/Getty Images/Picture Press RM hide caption

toggle caption
Tomas Rodriguez/Getty Images/Picture Press RM

Doctors, nurses, patients and activists listen to Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speak about Senate Republicans' health care bill on Friday at Bellevue Hospital in New York City. Schumer has vowed to help defeat the legislation, which the Congressional Budget Office scored on Monday. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., walks through the U.S. Capitol on Thursday following the release of a draft of the Senate Republicans' health care bill. An updated version was released on Monday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Senate Republicans Alter Health Care Bill To Avoid 'Death Spiral'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/534428929/534448068" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some lawmakers are raising concerns that the Senate health care bill could aggravate the problem of healthy people going without insurance, driving up costs for everyone else. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

How The Senate Health Care Bill Could Disrupt The Insurance Market

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/534153075/534163420" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The vast majority of contingent or independent workers in the U.S. do not receive employee benefits, though some companies and lawmakers are trying to change that. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hero Images/Getty Images

Efforts Increase To Bring Health And Other Benefits To Independent Workers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533943837/534143212" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell leaves the chamber after announcing the release of the Republicans' health care bill on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

CHART: Who Wins, Who Loses With Senate Health Care Bill

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533942041/533989411" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mario Schlosser, CEO of the startup Oscar Health, says he's optimistic that Congress will come up with a humane health care bill. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Noam Galai/Getty Images

In theory, "direct primary care" should result in better health for patients and lower health care costs overall. But some analysts say that approach just encourages the worried well to get more care than they need. BraunS /Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
BraunS /Getty Images

Dawn Poole and her husband have to regularly document their family finances to make sure their nine children, who all have complex health conditions, continue to qualify for Medicaid. Courtesy of the Poole family hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the Poole family

A bill that would allow Nevadans without insurance to buy into Medicaid starting in 2019 awaits Gov. Brian Sandoval's signature or veto. Kevin Clifford/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Clifford/AP

Nevada May Become First State To Offer Medicaid To All, Regardless Of Income

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/532783189/532816999" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Shifting messages from the U.S. Congress have left many would-be entrepreneurs, and workers who've recently been laid off, wondering how best to maintain health coverage. Michael Blann/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Blann/Getty Images

People who buy their own health insurance and make too much to get subsidies are most likely to feel the pain of an unstable market. PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images