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Critics of Anthem's policy say imposing a blanket rule that gives preference to freestanding imaging centers is at odds with promoting quality and will lead to fragmented care for patients. Media for Medical/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Media for Medical/UIG/Getty Images

Bernard Tyson, CEO of Kaiser Permanente, is optimistic about a bipartisan health bill. He cautions that partisanship will only lead to more insurance instability. Misha Friedman/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Misha Friedman/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Kaiser Permanente CEO Says A Bipartisan Health Bill Is The Best Way Forward

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Sens. Lindsey Graham (from left), Bill Cassidy and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell take questions during a press conference Tuesday. Graham and Cassidy were among the co-sponsors of a proposal to overhaul the Affordable Care Act. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A Tale Of 2 States: How California And Texas May Fare Under GOP Health Plan

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Affordable Care Act navigators helped guide those looking for insurance during an enrollment event at San Antonio's Southwest General Hospital last year. Beyond helping with initial enrollment, navigators often follow up with help later, as an applicant's income or job status changes. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Health insurance company Oscar has started its own ad campaign for the Affordable Care Act. These enrollment dates apply to New York state; the dates to enroll in federally run exchanges are Nov. 1 to Dec. 15. Oscar Health hide caption

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Oscar Health

As Federal Government Cuts Obamacare Ads, Private Insurer Steps Up

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The new Medicare cards (right) will not use Social Security numbers for identification. Instead, they will have random sequences of letters and numbers. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services /AP hide caption

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Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services /AP

Job candidates take a tour of the Amazon fulfillment center in Robbinsville, N.J., during a job fair last month. The Census Bureau says increased employment is what's driving higher income numbers. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander chairs the Senate's Health, Education, Labor and Pensions committee; Sen. Patty Murray is the committee's ranking Democrat. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty

The Senate health committee meets next month to discuss ways to stabilize the insurance markets. Insurers have until Sept. 27 to commit to selling policies on the ACA marketplaces in 2018. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

U.S. Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and other female senators were excluded from the Senate leadership health task force this summer. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Dillon Katz, at home in Delray Beach, Fla., says recovering drug users in his group counseling meetings frequently used to offer to help him get into a new treatment facility. He suspects now they were recruiters — so-called "body brokers" — who were receiving illegal kickbacks from the corrupt facility. Peter Haden/WLRN hide caption

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Peter Haden/WLRN

'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab

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An analysis by the Congressional Budget Office released Tuesday found that ending cost-sharing reduction payments to insurers, a move that President Trump is contemplating, would raise the deficit by $194 billion over 10 years. Melina Mara/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Melina Mara/The Washington Post/Getty Images

CBO Predicts Rise In Deficit If Trump Cuts Payments To Insurance Companies

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