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An unexpected charge related to a biopsy threatened the financial security of Brianna Snitchler and her partner. Callie Richmond for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Callie Richmond for Kaiser Health News

A Biopsy Came With An Unexpected $2,170 'Cover Charge' For The Hospital

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Some insurers using this new payment model offer a single fee to one OB-GYN or medical practice, which then uses part of that money to cover the hospital care involved in labor and delivery. Other insurers opt to cut a separate contract with the hospital. Adene Sanchez/Getty Images hide caption

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Adene Sanchez/Getty Images

Ric Peralta and his wife Lisa are both able to check Ric's blood sugar levels at any time, using the Dexcom app and an arm patch that measures the levels and sends the information wirelessly. Allison Zaucha for NPR hide caption

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Allison Zaucha for NPR

It's Not Just Insulin: Diabetes Patients Struggle To Get Crucial Supplies

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Visitors and park rangers at historic Fort Scott check out a medevac helicopter operated by Midwest AeroCare during the Kansas town's Good Ol' Days festival. Sarah Jane Tribble/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/Kaiser Health News

Air Ambulances Woo Rural Consumers With Memberships That May Leave Them Hanging

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Groupon and other deal sites are the latest marketing tactic in medicine, offering bargain prices for services such as CT scans. Colin Cuthbert/Science Photo Libra/Getty Images hide caption

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Colin Cuthbert/Science Photo Libra/Getty Images

President Trump talked about expanding health coverage options for small businesses in a Rose Garden gathering at the White House in June. Al Drago/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Before scheduling his hernia surgery, Wolfgang Balzer called the hospital, the surgeon and the anesthesiologist to get estimates for how much the procedure would cost. But when his bill came, the estimates he had obtained were wildly off. John Woike for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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John Woike for Kaiser Health News

Bill Of The Month: Estimate For Cost Of Hernia Surgery Misses The Mark

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The "Cadillac tax," an enacted but not yet implemented part of the Affordable Care Act, is a 40% tax on the most generous employer-provided health insurance plans — those that cost more than $11,200 per year for an individual policy or $30,150 for family coverage. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg Creative/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg Creative/Getty Images

"As deductibles rise, patients have the right to know the price of health care services so they can shop around for the best deal," says Seema Verma, who heads the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and announced the Trump administration's plan this week. Kevin Wolf/AP hide caption

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Kevin Wolf/AP

Sovereign Valentine, a personal trainer in Plains, Mont., needs dialysis for his end-stage renal disease. When he first started dialysis treatments, Fresenius Kidney Care clinic in Missoula charged $13,867.74 per session, or about 59 times the $235 Medicare pays for a dialysis session. Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News

The same steep growth and use of big data that attracted venture capital cash to companies that administer Medicare Advantage plans have led to scrutiny of the companies by government officials. Federal audits estimate such plans nationwide have overcharged taxpayers nearly $10 billion annually. 123light/Getty Images hide caption

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123light/Getty Images

Sovereign Valentine and his wife, Jessica, wait as a dialysis machine filters his blood. Before finding a dialysis clinic in their insurance network, the Valentines were charged more than a half-million dollars for 14 weeks of treatment. Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News

First Came Kidney Failure. Then There Was The $540,842 Bill For Dialysis

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Opponents running to Joe Biden's left say his health plan for America merely "tinkers around the edges" of the Affordable Care Act. But a close read reveals some initiatives in Biden's plan that are so expansive they might have trouble passing even a Congress held by Democrats. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Medicare Advantage plans, administered by private insurance companies under contract with Medicare, treat more than 22 million seniors — more than 1 in 3 people on Medicare. Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Demonstrators rallied in Sacramento in May for Medi-Cal expansion to undocumented Californians. When the state's budget was finalized, only young adults up to age 26 were authorized to be included in the expansion. Gov. Gavin Newsom says that's an important first step. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Young Undocumented Californians Cheer Promise Of Health Benefits

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