Parenting Parenting

Some research suggests that having multiples increases a parent's risk of mental health concerns — like depression and anxiety — before and after the children are born. Don't be afraid to admit it, parents advise. Emotional support can help. Terry Vine/Getty Images hide caption

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Terry Vine/Getty Images

Kelly Zimmerman holds her son Jaxton Wright at a parenting session at the Children's Health Center in Reading, Pa. The free program provides resources and social support to new parents in recovery from addiction, or who are otherwise vulnerable. Natalie Piserchio for NPR hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for NPR

Beyond Opioids: How A Family Came Together To Stay Together

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Martín Elfman for NPR

Stay-At-Home Dads Still Struggle With Diapers, Drool, Stigma And Isolation

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Francesco Zorzi for NPR

The Perils Of Pushing Kids Too Hard, And How Parents Can Learn To Back Off

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Fabio Consoli for NPR

Want Your Child To Eat (Almost) Everything? There Is A Way

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Adriana Zehbrauskas/for NPR

How To Get Your Kids To Do Chores (Without Resenting It)

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Sam Oozevaseuk Schimmel, 18, has grown up in both Alaska and Washington state. He is an advocate for Alaska Native youth. Kiliii Yuyan for NPR hide caption

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Kiliii Yuyan for NPR

The Conflicting Educations Of Sam Schimmel

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Want your kid to succeed? Don't try so hard. sturti/Getty Images hide caption

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sturti/Getty Images

The Carpenter Vs. The Gardener: Two Models Of Modern Parenting

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A poster put out by the U.S. Children's Bureau in 1918. Francis Luis Mora/Library of Congress hide caption

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Francis Luis Mora/Library of Congress

Parenting Advice From Uncle Sam

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Maria de los Angeles Tun Burgos with daughters Angela, 12, and Gelmy, 9, in their family home in a Maya village in Yucatán, Mexico. Adriana Zehbrauskas for NPR hide caption

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Adriana Zehbrauskas for NPR

Secrets Of A Maya Supermom: What Parenting Books Don't Tell You

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Lorena Bradford (left), head of accessible programs at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., leads a session of the museum's Just Us program. The program gives adults with memory loss and their caregivers a chance to explore and discuss works of art in a small-group setting. Lynne Shallcross/KHN hide caption

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Lynne Shallcross/KHN

Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., arrives at the Capitol for a vote with her new daughter, Maile, on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Tammy Duckworth Brings Her Newborn To Senate Floor After Rule Change

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Crystal Joyce's son — her youngest child — is in his senior year of high school, headed to college in the fall. Joyce (left) gets advice on the transition to being an empty nester from Ana Machado, whose children have all left home. Courtesy of Stephen Joyce and Wilmar Machado hide caption

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Courtesy of Stephen Joyce and Wilmar Machado

Adjusting To An Empty Nest Brings Grief, But Also Freedom

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Want your kid to succeed? Don't try that hard. sturti/Getty Images/Vetta hide caption

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sturti/Getty Images/Vetta

The Carpenter Vs. The Gardener: Two Models Of Modern Parenting

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Audrey Degraaf (left) found out this summer that she's pregnant with triplets. Lorie Shelley gave birth to triplets — two boys and a girl — nearly 20 years ago. Courtesy of Audrey Degraaf; Lorie Shelley hide caption

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Courtesy of Audrey Degraaf; Lorie Shelley

Color Coding Your Babies And Other Tips For Raising Triplets

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

Alexa, Are You Safe For My Kids?

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Deona Scott and her son Phoenix at her graduation from Charleston Southern University in South Carolina in 2015. Scott now works full time for Nurse-Family Partnership, a program she credits with helping to prepare her to be a good mother. Courtesy of Deona Scott hide caption

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Courtesy of Deona Scott