Parenting Parenting

Giving dads a task — in this case, reading — seemed to suit them better than the kind of parenting classes favored by moms. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

The American Academy of Pediatrics' guidelines on when children should stay home are more liberal than those of many day care centers. Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images hide caption

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Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images
LA Johnson/NPR

Screen Time Reality Check — For Kids And Parents

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(Left) Shana Steele with her three children. (Top) Vannessa Kamerschen with her daughter. (Bottom) David Meissner with his son. Courtesy of Shana Steele, Vannessa Kamerschen and David Meissner hide caption

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Courtesy of Shana Steele, Vannessa Kamerschen and David Meissner
Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

Poverty Wages For U.S. Child Care Workers May Be Behind High Turnover

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Pam Rector (left) with her daughter Grace became a single mother by choice when she was ready to have a child. Liv Aannestad is expecting her first child in March through the same process, and like all expecting parents she has some questions. Courtesy of Pam Rector/Courtesy of Liv Aannestad hide caption

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Courtesy of Pam Rector/Courtesy of Liv Aannestad

Single Moms By Choice Don't Need To Do It Alone

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Pediatricians realize parents need strategies beyond "Put down that phone!" Jiangang Wang/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Jiangang Wang/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

No Snapchat In The Bedroom? An Online Tool To Manage Kids' Media Use

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

What Makes For Quality Child Care? It Depends Whom You Ask

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A Pediatrician's View Of Paid Parental Leave

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Iris and Eli Fugate with their 6-month-old son Jack, at the family's home in San Diego. Thanks to California's paid family leave law, Iris was able to take six weeks off when Jack was born, and Eli took three weeks, with plans to take the remaining time over the next few months. Sandy Huffaker for NPR hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker for NPR

How California's 'Paid Family Leave' Law Buys Time For New Parents

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