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Lorena Bradford (left), head of accessible programs at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., leads a session of the museum's Just Us program. The program gives adults with memory loss and their caregivers a chance to explore and discuss works of art in a small-group setting. Lynne Shallcross/KHN hide caption

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Lynne Shallcross/KHN

Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., arrives at the Capitol for a vote with her new daughter, Maile, on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Tammy Duckworth Brings Her Newborn To Senate Floor After Rule Change

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Crystal Joyce's son — her youngest child — is in his senior year of high school, headed to college in the fall. Joyce (left) gets advice on the transition to being an empty nester from Ana Machado, whose children have all left home. Courtesy of Stephen Joyce and Wilmar Machado hide caption

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Courtesy of Stephen Joyce and Wilmar Machado

Adjusting To An Empty Nest Brings Grief, But Also Freedom

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Want your kid to succeed? Don't try that hard. sturti/Getty Images/Vetta hide caption

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sturti/Getty Images/Vetta

The Carpenter Vs. The Gardener: Two Models Of Modern Parenting

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Audrey Degraaf (left) found out this summer that she's pregnant with triplets. Lorie Shelley gave birth to triplets — two boys and a girl — nearly 20 years ago. Courtesy of Audrey Degraaf; Lorie Shelley hide caption

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Courtesy of Audrey Degraaf; Lorie Shelley

Color Coding Your Babies And Other Tips For Raising Triplets

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

Alexa, Are You Safe For My Kids?

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Deona Scott and her son Phoenix at her graduation from Charleston Southern University in South Carolina in 2015. Scott now works full time for Nurse-Family Partnership, a program she credits with helping to prepare her to be a good mother. Courtesy of Deona Scott hide caption

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Courtesy of Deona Scott

Writer Greg O'Brien and his daughter, Colleen, play with Adeline, Greg's 8-month-old granddaughter. Eight years ago, Greg was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Alzheimer's Starts To Steal The Joy Of Being A Grandfather

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For children over 1 year old, pediatricians strongly recommend whole fruit instead of juice, because it contains fiber, which slows the absorption of sugar and fills you up the way juice doesn't. KathyDewar/Getty Images hide caption

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KathyDewar/Getty Images

"When you have kids, and when life is just going by faster and faster, you just forget things so easily," says David. "And you think you're not going to forget, but you do," adds Annie. Bethany Froelich/Courtesy of Annie Hudson and David VonDerLinn hide caption

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Bethany Froelich/Courtesy of Annie Hudson and David VonDerLinn

Preserving Memories: In Emails To A Toddler, A Window Into Her Parents' Love

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Social media postings showing parents "disciplining" their children, including (from left) LaToya Graham, ReShonda Tate Billingsley and Tavis Sellers, went viral. ABC 2 News WMAR; ReShonda Tate Billingsley; Tavis Sellers/Screenshots by NPR hide caption

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ABC 2 News WMAR; ReShonda Tate Billingsley; Tavis Sellers/Screenshots by NPR