Parenting Parenting

Psychologists say spanking and other forms of corporal punishment don't get children to change their behavior for the better. Science Photo Library/Corbis hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Corbis

Dale Conour with his son Quinn, 2. Conour's two children from a previous marriage were already young men when Quinn was born. Rosanne Sax/Courtesy of Dale Conour hide caption

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Rosanne Sax/Courtesy of Dale Conour

Making Fatherhood An Insider's Game: Becoming A Dad, Again, At 49

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Lindolfo Carballo, an immigrant from El Salvador, meets his son, Raynel, outside school. In El Salvador, he says, families often "teach their boys one thing and their girls differently." He's trying to set a different example for his children. Sarah Tilotta for NPR hide caption

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Sarah Tilotta for NPR

To Model Manhood, Immigrant Dads Draw From Two Worlds

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This hangout spot in East Baltimore — like the rest of the city's outdoor spaces — now comes with a police-enforced nighttime age limit. Children under 14 must be indoors by 9 p.m. each night, all year long. Kids age 14-16 can stay out a little later, until 10 p.m. on school nights and 11 p.m. on other nights. Courtesy of Brian O'Doherty hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian O'Doherty

For Their Own Good? New Curfew Sends Baltimore Kids Home Early

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Amy Myers talks with her son Kamron, 18, in the backyard of their home in Boise, Idaho. She has found raising a teenager to be extremely stressful. Kyle Green for NPR hide caption

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Kyle Green for NPR

Want More Stress In Your Life? Try Parenting A Teenager

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Noah Cummings, 13, starts the morning with his mom, Heather Cummings, at home in Epsom, N.H. Ellen Webber for NPR hide caption

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Ellen Webber for NPR

Anxious Parents Can Learn How To Reduce Anxiety In Their Kids

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High school students whose friends posted photos of drinking and smoking were about 20 percent more likely to become drinkers or smokers themselves. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Of Cigs And Selfies: Teens Imitate Risky Behavior Shared Online

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