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Nurses

Lenh Vuong, a clinical social worker at Los Angeles County+USC Medical Center, checks on a former John Doe patient she recently helped identify. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/KHN

Will computers alienate us from the healing touch? Chris Nickels for NPR hide caption

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Chris Nickels for NPR

As Artificial Intelligence Moves Into Medicine, The Human Touch Could Be A Casualty

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According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, incidents of serious workplace violence are four times more common in health care than in private industry. Most assaults come from patients and patients' families. Phil Fisk/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Phil Fisk/Cultura RF/Getty Images

Facing Escalating Workplace Violence, Hospital Employees Have Had Enough

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A moment from Embodied Labs' virtual reality video of Clay Crowder, a fictional 66-year-old man with incurable lung cancer. In this scene, Clay's family gathers around his bed, reassuring him that it's OK to let go of life. Embodied Labs hide caption

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Embodied Labs

Isela was denied life insurance because her medication list showed a prescription for the opioid-reversal drug naloxone. The Boston Medical Center nurse says she wants to have the drug on hand so she can save others. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Nurse Denied Life Insurance Because She Carries Naloxone

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Training on how to spot human trafficking is given not only to doctors and nurses but also to registration and reception staff, social workers and security guards. A-Digit/Getty Images hide caption

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A-Digit/Getty Images

Unlike the three-year residency programs that doctors must generally complete after medical school in order to practice medicine, nurse practitioner residency programs, sometimes called fellowships, are completely voluntary. Antenna/fStop/Getty Images hide caption

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Antenna/fStop/Getty Images

Ogechi Ukachu, one of the registered nurses recently hired to help staff D.C.'s "Right Care Right Now" program, takes a training call at the city's 911 call center. Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR

Can Triage Nurses Help Prevent 911 Overload?

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Rosemary Grant is a registered nurse and helps coordinate sepsis care at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. The center's goal, she says, is to get a patient who might be developing sepsis antibiotics within three hours. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Ian C. Bates for NPR

Synergy Between Nurses And Automation Could Be Key To Finding Sepsis Early

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Alex Wubbels, the nurse who was arrested for refusing to let a police officer draw blood from an unconscious patient, has settled with Salt Lake City and the University of Utah for $500,000. Wubbels is shown here during an interview in September. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Hundreds of homes in the Coffey Park neighborhood that were destroyed by the Tubbs Fire on October 11, 2017, in Santa Rosa, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As She Evacuated Patients From The Hospital, Her Home Burned

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The maternal mortality rate in the U.S. is the highest among affluent nations. Researchers believe that with better education, postpartum nurses could help mothers identify life-threatening complications. Mart Klein/Getty Images hide caption

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Mart Klein/Getty Images

Many Nurses Lack Knowledge Of Health Risks To Mothers After Childbirth

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Calls for tort reform in regards to medical malpractice are popular on the campaign trail. But research shows that costs from medical liability make up just 2 to 2.5 percent of total health care spending in the U.S. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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FangXiaNuo/Getty Images/iStockphoto