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Dr. Peter Grinspoon was a practicing physician when he became addicted to opioids. When he got caught, Grinspoon wasn't allowed access to what's now the standard treatment for addiction — buprenorphine or methadone (in addition to counseling) — precisely because he was a doctor. /Tony Luong for NPR hide caption

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/Tony Luong for NPR

For Health Workers Struggling With Addiction, Why Are Treatment Options Limited?

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Twin brothers Ivan (left) and Jose López expect to make about $6 a month each when they start work as nurses this month. To boost their income, they care for elderly individuals living at home. Gustavo Ocando Alex for NPR hide caption

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Gustavo Ocando Alex for NPR

Geriatrics is a specialty that should adapt and change with each patient, says physician and author Louise Aronson. "I need to be a different sort of doctor for people at different ages and phases of old age." Robert Lang Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Lang Photography/Getty Images

A Clearer Map For Aging: 'Elderhood' Shows How Geriatricians Help Seniors Thrive

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'Patients Will Die': One County's Challenge To Trump's 'Conscience Rights' Rule

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Lenh Vuong, a clinical social worker at Los Angeles County+USC Medical Center, checks on a former John Doe patient she recently helped identify. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/KHN

Will computers alienate us from the healing touch? Chris Nickels for NPR hide caption

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Chris Nickels for NPR

As Artificial Intelligence Moves Into Medicine, The Human Touch Could Be A Casualty

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According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, incidents of serious workplace violence are four times more common in health care than in private industry. Most assaults come from patients and patients' families. Phil Fisk/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Phil Fisk/Cultura RF/Getty Images

Facing Escalating Workplace Violence, Hospital Employees Have Had Enough

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A moment from Embodied Labs' virtual reality video of Clay Crowder, a fictional 66-year-old man with incurable lung cancer. In this scene, Clay's family gathers around his bed, reassuring him that it's OK to let go of life. Embodied Labs hide caption

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Embodied Labs

Isela was denied life insurance because her medication list showed a prescription for the opioid-reversal drug naloxone. The Boston Medical Center nurse says she wants to have the drug on hand so she can save others. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Nurse Denied Life Insurance Because She Carries Naloxone

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Training on how to spot human trafficking is given not only to doctors and nurses but also to registration and reception staff, social workers and security guards. A-Digit/Getty Images hide caption

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A-Digit/Getty Images

Unlike the three-year residency programs that doctors must generally complete after medical school in order to practice medicine, nurse practitioner residency programs, sometimes called fellowships, are completely voluntary. Antenna/fStop/Getty Images hide caption

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Antenna/fStop/Getty Images

Ogechi Ukachu, one of the registered nurses recently hired to help staff D.C.'s "Right Care Right Now" program, takes a training call at the city's 911 call center. Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR

Can Triage Nurses Help Prevent 911 Overload?

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Rosemary Grant is a registered nurse and helps coordinate sepsis care at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. The center's goal, she says, is to get a patient who might be developing sepsis antibiotics within three hours. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Ian C. Bates for NPR

Synergy Between Nurses And Automation Could Be Key To Finding Sepsis Early

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Alex Wubbels, the nurse who was arrested for refusing to let a police officer draw blood from an unconscious patient, has settled with Salt Lake City and the University of Utah for $500,000. Wubbels is shown here during an interview in September. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP