Ukraine Ukraine

Ukrainian film director Oleg Sentsov is seen inside of the defendant's cage in a military courtroom in the southwestern Russian city of Rostov-on-Don in July 2015. Sergey Venyavsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergey Venyavsky/AFP/Getty Images

Ukrainian Film Director Stages Hunger Strike In Russian Jail During World Cup

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Marina Muun for NPR

Her Son Is One Of The Few Children To Have 3 Parents' DNA

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A scientist from the Nadiya Clinic in Kiev, Ukraine inserts a needle into a fertilized egg to extract the DNA of a man and woman trying to have a baby. The clinic is combining the DNA from three different people to create babies for women who are infertile. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

Clinic Claims Success In Making Babies With 3 Parents' DNA

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At a news conference on Thursday in Kiev, Arkady Babchenko answered critics of his staged death. Authorities had announced that he had been fatally shot at his home on Tuesday. Genya Savilov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Genya Savilov/AFP/Getty Images

Russian journalist Arkady Babchenko, who Kiev police said Tuesday had been killed, showed up alive at a press conference Wednesday. His death was faked as part of a sting operation by the Ukrainian Security Service. Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images

Pedestrians pass by a billboard with an image of Russia's President Vladimir Putin and lettering "Strong president - Strong Russia!" in Simferopol, Crimea in January. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Former Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili speaks to the media prior to a scheduled court hearing in Kiev last month. Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images

Sergey Naryshkin speaks during the European Social Charter Conference in March 2016 in Turin, Italy, prior to his appointment to head Russia's SVR foreign intelligence service. Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images hide caption

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Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

A Ukrainian serviceman prepares ammunition for the fighting with pro-Russian separatists in Avdiivka, Ukraine last March. Anatolii Stepanov /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anatolii Stepanov /AFP/Getty Images

Former Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili talks on a cellphone at a barricade in front of the Ukrainian Parliament in Kiev, where his supporters are camping. Sergei Chuzavkov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Chuzavkov/AFP/Getty Images

Former Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili (center) greets his supporters after escaping a van headed for jail in Kiev on Tuesday. Evgeniy Maloletka/AP hide caption

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Evgeniy Maloletka/AP

(Left) Vika, 10, in the underground room where she and her family sleep to stay safe from regular shelling in Spartak, Ukraine. (Right) Vika keeps her stuffed animals in this underground cubby, which also serves as a space to play. (Bottom) Vika and her grandmother, Valentina Pleshkova, 54. Brendan Hoffman/Prime for NPR hide caption

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Brendan Hoffman/Prime for NPR

Donald Trump Jr. hugs his father, Donald Trump, during a campaign rally in Ohio, weeks after Trump Jr. met with a Russian lawyer, as he sought dirt against Democrat Hillary Clinton. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Cash machines in a supermarket in Kiev weren't working on Wednesday after a cyberattack paralyzed computers in Ukraine and elsewhere. Victims included government offices, energy companies, banks and gas stations. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Employees at a store in Kiev, Ukraine, read a ransomware demand for $300 in bitcoin to free files encrypted by the Petya software virus. The malicious program has spread to dozens of countries. Vincent Mundy/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Vincent Mundy/Bloomberg via Getty Images

'Petya' Ransomware Hits At Least 65 Countries; Microsoft Traces It To Tax Software

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