Senate Senate

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 6, the third day of his confirmation hearing. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump's poll numbers are starting to dip at exactly the wrong time. A new NPR/Marist poll finds Trump's approval rating at 39 percent. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Brett Kavanaugh (left) speaks in 2006, when he was a nominee for the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. With him is then-Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Democratic Sen. Mazie Hirono may have a quiet demeanor, but that shouldn't be confused for a lack of toughness. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Quiet Rage Of Mazie Hirono

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky told NPR that he continues to support the Mueller investigation and that nothing he heard in a secret briefing Thursday changes his mind. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

McConnell Says He Supports Mueller Investigation

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas, (right) prepare to talk to reporters following the weekly Senate Republican policy luncheon at the U.S. Capitol on May 15, 2018. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The War Over Confirming Federal Judges Is Heating Up — Again

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Gina Haspel, the nominee to be CIA director, testifies at a Senate intelligence committee hearing on May 9. Haspel now appears to have enough Senate support to win confirmation. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Former Massey CEO and West Virginia Republican senatorial candidate Don Blankenship (center) greets supporters Doug Smith and Wanda Smith prior to a town hall in Logan, W.Va., on Jan. 18. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley confers with ranking member Dianne Feinstein at a committee hearing on April 19. The committee has approved legislation to protect special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Bill To Protect Mueller Investigation Approved By Senate Judiciary Committee

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Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., arrives at the Capitol for a vote with her new daughter, Maile, on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Tammy Duckworth Brings Her Newborn To Senate Floor After Rule Change

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Sen. Tammy Duckworth walks across stage at the Democratic National Convention in 2016. She is the first senator to give birth while serving in office. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., said at a Capitol Hill press conference on Tuesday that the House would wait "to see what the Senate can do" on gun legislation. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Congress Stalled On Bills To Tighten Gun Background Check System

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Led by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., senators are beginning debate on immigration legislation on Monday. It's anyone's guess what the outcome will be. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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President Trump listens during a White House meeting with law enforcement officials on the MS-13 street gang and border security. To pressure Democrats to sign onto his immigration plan, he threatened another government shutdown if they don't agree. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

House Passes Funding Extension After Trump Says 'I'd Love To See A Shutdown'

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Canadian athletes will be singing new lyrics at sports events. Here, Benjamin Thorne of Canada celebrates after winning bronze in the Men's 20km Race Walk final at the IAAF World Athletics Championships in 2015 in Beijing. Patrick Smith/Getty Images hide caption

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President-elect Donald Trump calls out to the media as Mitt Romney leaves Trump National Golf Club Bedminster in Bedminster, N.J., shortly after Election Day. Romney was under consideration for secretary of state at the time. Now, he's eyeing a Senate race in Utah. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Is Trump Waging A Hidden Campaign Against Mitt Romney?

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