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President Trump and Sen. Ted Cruz, once political combatants, embrace at a rally in Houston on Monday. "You know, we had our little difficulties," Trump said for the crowd. "It got ugly. ... But nobody has helped me more." Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump has refused to divest himself of businesses and investments that could pose conflicts of interest. For example, the Trump International Hotel (seen here), located just blocks from the White House, regularly hosts events with foreign diplomats, interest groups and industry associations. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., points at Democrats as he defends Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing last week. Tom Williams/AP hide caption

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Tom Williams/AP

Will The Kavanaugh Saga Leave Bruises That Heal Or Permanent Scars?

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Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 6, the third day of his confirmation hearing. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump's poll numbers are starting to dip at exactly the wrong time. A new NPR/Marist poll finds Trump's approval rating at 39 percent. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Brett Kavanaugh (left) speaks in 2006, when he was a nominee for the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. With him is then-Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Democratic Sen. Mazie Hirono may have a quiet demeanor, but that shouldn't be confused for a lack of toughness. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Quiet Rage Of Mazie Hirono

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky told NPR that he continues to support the Mueller investigation and that nothing he heard in a secret briefing Thursday changes his mind. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

McConnell Says He Supports Mueller Investigation

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas, (right) prepare to talk to reporters following the weekly Senate Republican policy luncheon at the U.S. Capitol on May 15, 2018. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The War Over Confirming Federal Judges Is Heating Up — Again

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Gina Haspel, the nominee to be CIA director, testifies at a Senate intelligence committee hearing on May 9. Haspel now appears to have enough Senate support to win confirmation. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Former Massey CEO and West Virginia Republican senatorial candidate Don Blankenship (center) greets supporters Doug Smith and Wanda Smith prior to a town hall in Logan, W.Va., on Jan. 18. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley confers with ranking member Dianne Feinstein at a committee hearing on April 19. The committee has approved legislation to protect special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Bill To Protect Mueller Investigation Approved By Senate Judiciary Committee

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Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., arrives at the Capitol for a vote with her new daughter, Maile, on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Tammy Duckworth Brings Her Newborn To Senate Floor After Rule Change

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Sen. Tammy Duckworth walks across stage at the Democratic National Convention in 2016. She is the first senator to give birth while serving in office. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., said at a Capitol Hill press conference on Tuesday that the House would wait "to see what the Senate can do" on gun legislation. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Congress Stalled On Bills To Tighten Gun Background Check System

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Led by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., senators are beginning debate on immigration legislation on Monday. It's anyone's guess what the outcome will be. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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