universe universe

Spiral galaxy NGC 6814, whose luminous nucleus and spectacular sweeping arms, rippled with an intricate pattern of dark dust, are captured by the Hubble Space Telescope. ESA/Hubble & NASA hide caption

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ESA/Hubble & NASA

Proxima Centauri lies in the constellation of Centaurus (The Centaur), just over four light-years from Earth. Although it looks bright through the eye of Hubble, Proxima Centauri is not visible to the naked eye. ESA/Hubble & NASA hide caption

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ESA/Hubble & NASA

An artist's depiction of the surface of the planet Proxima b as it orbits the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri, the closest star to our solar system. The planet is a bit more massive than Earth, scientists say, and circles its star once every 11 days. ESO/M. Kornmesser/Nature hide caption

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ESO/M. Kornmesser/Nature

This Planet Just Outside Our Solar System Is 'Potentially Habitable'

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Lasers and mirrors are used to carefully measure shifts in space-time. To avoid contamination, protective clothing must be worn at all times. LIGO Lab/Caltech/MIT hide caption

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LIGO Lab/Caltech/MIT

How To Catch The Biggest Wave In The Universe

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The pair of galaxies NGC 1531/2, engaged in a spirited waltz, is located about 70 million light-years away toward the southern constellation Eridanus (The River). R. Gendler and J.E. Ovaldsen/ESO/IDA hide caption

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R. Gendler and J.E. Ovaldsen/ESO/IDA

Does The Size Of Space Freak You Out?

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(Top row, left to right) Titan, Earth's moon, Europa and Enceladus. (Bottom row, left to right) Callisto, Charon, Ariel and lo. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Hot On The Trail Of Alien Moons

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This computer-simulated image shows a supermassive black hole at the core of a galaxy. The cosmic monster's powerful gravity distorts space around it like the mirror in a fun house, smearing the light from nearby stars. NASA/ESA/D. Coe, J. Anderson and R. van der Marel (Space Telescope Science Institute) hide caption

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NASA/ESA/D. Coe, J. Anderson and R. van der Marel (Space Telescope Science Institute)

Supermassive Black Holes May Be More Common Than Anyone Imagined

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An artist's impression of the superluminous supernova as it would appear from a planet in the same galaxy, about 10,000 light-years away. The exploding star is 570 billion times brighter than our sun. Jin Ma/Beijing Planetarium/Science hide caption

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Jin Ma/Beijing Planetarium/Science

Record-Busting Star Explosion Baffles Sky Watchers

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A new study shows energy output from 200,000 galaxies is half what it was billions of years ago. It's further evidence the universe is slowly declining. This undated NASA Hubble Space Telescope image shows the spiral galaxy NGC 1512 captured in all wavelengths from ultraviolet to infrared. Kevin Dietsch/UPI/Landov hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/UPI/Landov