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The March For Our Lives movement is hitting the road this summer to register young people to vote ahead of the November mid-term elections. Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images

Parkland Survivors Launch Tour To Register Young Voters And Get Them Out In November

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In an Oct. 2012 file photo, voters cast their votes through absentee ballots for the November election in Cape Elizabeth, Maine. Ranked-choice voting will be put to its biggest test when Maine uses the system in a statewide primary election on June 12, the first time a U.S. state has adopted the voting method. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Maine Voters To Decide On Whether They'll Rank Candidates In Future Elections

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Voters cast their ballots in Salem, Ohio, on Nov. 8, 2016. On Wednesday the Supreme Court hears a case about Ohio's voter registration policy. Ty Wright/Getty Images hide caption

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Ty Wright/Getty Images

In Key Voting-Rights Case, Court Appears Divided Over Ohio's 'Use It Or Lose It' Rule

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President Trump speaks alongside Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach during the first meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in July. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Goodbye To A Commission Established To Solve A Nonexistent Problem

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Election officials in Newport News, Va., examine ballots during a recount for a House of Delegates race on Tuesday, Dec. 19, 2017. Ben Finley/AP hide caption

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Ben Finley/AP

A Single Vote Has Flipped Control Of Virginia's House Of Delegates

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Kansas Secretary of State, Kris Kobach, left, and Vice President Pence at the first meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, in July. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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President Trump speaks while flanked by Kansas Secretary of State, Kris Kobach (left) and Vice President Pence during the first meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who was eventually named vice chair of a commission on election integrity that has been beset with controversy, joins then-President-elect Donald Trump at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., in November 2016. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Amid Skepticism And Scrutiny, Election Integrity Commission Holds First Meeting

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A man votes in November in Durham, N.C. The U.S. Supreme Court had refused to reinstate strict voter restrictions in time for Election Day. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

A view of a ballot scanner at a New York City Board of Elections voting machine facility warehouse just before last November's election. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

State And Local Officials Wary Of Federal Government's Election Security Efforts

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In November, voters in Oklahoma approved criminal justice reforms such as making possession of drugs a misdemeanor and redirecting state money to treatment programs. Now there are several bills to repeal the reforms. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Oklahoma Lawmakers File Bills To Repeal Criminal Justice Reforms

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