Eggs Eggs

Artist's rendition of a family of pterosaurs, which had massive wingspans of up to 13 feet and likely ate fish with their large teeth-filled jaws. Illustrated by Zhao Chuang hide caption

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Illustrated by Zhao Chuang

Eggs are being progressively reintroduced in Dutch markets, including this one in Alkmaar, after a contamination scare prompted supermarkets in several European countries to pull their supplies of eggs. John Thys/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John Thys/AFP/Getty Images

An international team of scientists believes it has solved the mystery of how eggs got their shapes. Frans Lanting/Mint Images RM/Getty Images hide caption

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Frans Lanting/Mint Images RM/Getty Images

How Do Eggs Get Their Shapes? Scientists Think They've Cracked It

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Cloud eggs: It's not just Instagrammers who find them pretty. Chefs of the 17th century whipped them up, too. Then, as now, they were meant to impress. Maria Godoy/NPR hide caption

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Maria Godoy/NPR

Cloud Eggs: The Latest Instagram Food Fad Is Actually Centuries Old

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French artist Abraham Poincheval sits over real chicken eggs until they hatch at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris. Stephane de Sakutin /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephane de Sakutin /AFP/Getty Images

An Artist Incubating Chicken Eggs Is No Joke. But Is It Art?

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As more research suggests some degree of dietary cholesterol is harmless, if not healthy, the egg's reputation is slowly returning. Yet some experts worry the science is being misinterpreted and spun. Kelly Jo Smart/NPR hide caption

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Kelly Jo Smart/NPR

Non-GMO eggs. (this photo is for promo only, not for the page) Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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Morgan McCloy/NPR

Organic Food Fights Back Against 'Non-GMO' Rival

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Currently, only about 10 percent of egg-laying chickens in the U.S. live in cage-free houses like the one seen in this photo. Courtesy of Big Dutchman, Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of Big Dutchman, Inc.

Most U.S. Egg Producers Are Now Choosing Cage-Free Houses

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Cage-free chickens in a barn near Hershey, Pa., get to roam and perch on steel rods, but they don't go outside. This week, McDonald's became the latest big buyer to demand cage-free eggs. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

The Latest Scramble In The Egg Industry: McDonald's Is Going Cage-Free

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A plate of huevos rancheros topped with a basted egg. Lydia Thompson/NPR hide caption

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Lydia Thompson/NPR

The Basted Egg: A Foolproof Play On The Poach

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The hard part of making an egg replacement product is coming up with a substitute for the protein in egg whites. Wilson Hui/Flickr hide caption

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Wilson Hui/Flickr

Eggs Go AWOL, And Bakers Scramble For High-Tech Substitutes

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