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Ann Kim, owner of Hello Pizza in Edina, Minn., holds a Sicilian pan pie and a Hello Rita pizza. "Women can make progress in pizza that is harder in the macho restaurant world," Kim says. Bruce Bisping/Star Tribune via Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bisping/Star Tribune via Getty Images

It has been two years since the start of the #MeToo movement, with many powerful men accused of sexual misconduct. Some are now attempting comebacks, raising questions about rehabilitation, redemption and reentry. Matt Chinworth for NPR hide caption

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Matt Chinworth for NPR

Is Redemption Possible In The Aftermath Of #MeToo?

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A network of reproductive rights advocates is working to share information about self-induced abortion, both in person and over the Internet. Karina Perez for NPR hide caption

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Karina Perez for NPR

With Abortion Restrictions On The Rise, Some Women Induce Their Own

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Dr. Rebecca Gomperts says the government has seized abortion drugs she has prescribed from overseas to patients in the U.S. The drugs are approved by the FDA to induce abortion under a doctor's direction. Stormi Greener/Star Tribune via Getty Images hide caption

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Stormi Greener/Star Tribune via Getty Images

U.S. forward Alex Morgan celebrates her hat trick with defender Tobin Heath (17) and other teammates during the second half of a Tournament of Nations soccer match against Japan in July 2018. Colin E. Braley/AP hide caption

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Colin E. Braley/AP

In Soccer's Equal Pay Suit, A May 2020 Trial Is 'Good Overall,' Says Alex Morgan

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Jamaica's Reggae Girlz celebrate winning a penalty kick shootout against Panama to advance to this year's Women's World Cup. Richard W. Rodriguez/AP hide caption

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Richard W. Rodriguez/AP

Underdog 'Reggae Girlz' Make History at Women's World Cup

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Manisha Jaisi, 16, poses at the shed outside her house where she sleeps when she has her period. Jaisi got her period two months after her neighbor, Dambara Upadhyay, died of unknown causes while sleeping in a similar shed in 2016. Jaisi says she never goes without her phone in the shed because she's scared after Upadhyay's death. Sajana Shrestha for NPR hide caption

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Sajana Shrestha for NPR

Why It's Hard To Ban The Menstrual Shed

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A South Korean woman has her head shaved in a photograph taken by Jeon Bora. Having short hair and no makeup is a common symbol of the "escape the corset" movement, which aims to reject South Korea's standards of beauty and social pressure to conform. Jeon's photographs document the women involved in this movement in stark black-and-white images. Jeon Bora hide caption

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Jeon Bora

South Korean Women 'Escape The Corset' And Reject Their Country's Beauty Ideals

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Melinda Gates at a panel discussion in New York in February. She is the author of a new book, The Moment of Lift: How Empowering Women Changes the World. John Lamparski/Getty Images hide caption

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John Lamparski/Getty Images

Melinda Gates On Marriage, Parenting And Why She Made Bill Drive The Kids To School

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