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Participants cheer a speaker during the Women's March "Power to the Polls" voter registration tour launch at Sam Boyd Stadium in Las Vegas on Jan. 21. Sam Morris/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Morris/Getty Images

More Than Twice As Many Women Are Running For Congress In 2018 Compared With 2016

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Every ad in the Seoul Metro's Apujeong station is for a plastic surgery clinic. In response to a growing number of complaints from riders, the Seoul Metro announced it will ban advertisements for cosmetic surgery at its stations. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

In Seoul, A Plastic Surgery Capital, Residents Frown On Ads For Cosmetic Procedure

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Marie Curie holds her daughter, Irene, for a photo in 1904 with husband Pierre in the garden of the Sevres Office of Weights and Measures in Sevres, France. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Cecile Richards attends the 2017 Glamour Women of the Year Awards at Kings Theatre on Monday, Nov. 13, 2017, in New York. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Heidi Hartmann, the president of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, says women in retail lost hundreds of thousands of jobs over the last year, and men gained more than 100,000 jobs. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Analysis Shows Women Lost Jobs In Retail Last Year, Though Men Gained

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A woman farmer makes hay bales in Kashmir, India. In India, women comprise about a third of the agricultural labor in developing countries. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Working Moms Have Been A 'Thing' Since Ancient History

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Lawmakers in the Kumamoto Municipal Assembly talk with member Yuka Ogata, who brought her infant son to work. The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Imag hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Imag

Japanese Lawmaker's Baby Gets Booted From The Floor

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Last summer, South Koreans left messages of their sexual harassment and assaults on Post-it notes at an exit of Gangnam subway station. Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images

Workers pull pipes from an oil well in 2016 near Crescent, Okla. The oil industry wants to attract a new, more diverse generation of workers, but a history of racism and sexism makes that difficult. J Pat Carter/Getty Images hide caption

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J Pat Carter/Getty Images

Big Oil Has A Diversity Problem

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