women women

Saudi women check out cars at an automotive exhibition for women in the Saudi capital Riyadh on May 13. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

Arrests Of Saudi Women's Rights Activists 'Point To The Limits Of Change'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/613040254/613960570" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saudi activist Aziza al-Yousef was arrested this week, along with other women's activists. In this March 29, 2014 photo, she drives a car on a highway in Riyadh as part of a campaign to defy Saudi Arabia's ban on women driving. Hasan Jamali/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Hasan Jamali/AP

In the division of household tasks, one study shows that washing dishes is the category with the biggest discrepancy between men and women. Alex Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wilson/Getty Images

Oyster farmer and scientist Lisa Calvo leads a team of women that harvests oysters along the New Jersey coast. Calvo says she is inspired by the tenacity, skill and grit of women now coming into the industry. Jenn Hall/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jenn Hall/NPR

Britain's Health and Social Care Secretary Jeremy Hunt arrives at 10 Downing Street in central London on March 13. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images

Winners of the 2018 Skoll Awards for Social Entrepreneurship (from left) are Jennifer Pahlka, Harish Hande, Jess Ladd, Lesley Marincola, Anushka Ratnayake and Barbara Pierce Bush. David Fisher/Skoll Foundation hide caption

toggle caption
David Fisher/Skoll Foundation

Khadire Tahiraj (left) runs the Center for Promotion of Women's Rights in the Drenas municipality in central Kosovo. The center cares for scores of wartime rape survivors, including Sana (right). Sana is not her real name; she chose it for herself because she doesn't want her family to know she was raped. "We are like orphans," Sana says. "And Kadire is like our mother." Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Joanna Kakissis/NPR

In Kosovo, War Rape Survivors Can Now Receive Reparations. But Shame Endures For Many

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/598832041/600166280" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
NPR

The Wave Of Female Candidates Is Set For A Wave Of Losses, Come November

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/594096515/595345032" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Colombian chef turned social entrepreneur, Leonor Espinosa has made it her mission to revive traditional agriculture, ancestral foodways and culinary know-how among rural, mainly indigenous and Afro-Colombian people. Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images

Atara Bernstein and Ariel Pasternak founded Pineapple Collaborative to create a space where women in food could share ideas. Benjamin Herskovitz/courtesy Pineapple Collaborative hide caption

toggle caption
Benjamin Herskovitz/courtesy Pineapple Collaborative