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A Russian launch vehicle carrying the Progress M-27M cargo ship lifts off from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Tuesday. Fears mounted Wednesday that the unmanned cargo capsule was lost and may plunge back to Earth as ground control failed to gain control of the orbiting ship for a second day in a row. Roscosmos /EPA /Landov hide caption

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Roscosmos /EPA /Landov

This artist rendering shows Kepler-11, a sun-like star around which six planets orbit. A planet-hunting telescope is finding whole new worlds of possibilities in the search for alien life, including more than 50 potential planets that initially appear to be in habitable zones. The agency's chief scientist said Tuesday there will be "strong indications" of alien life within a decade. NASA/AP hide caption

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NASA/AP
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Why Doesn't Your Butt Fall Through The Chair?

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Planet: bottom of a glass containing half and half, water, food coloring. Moons: bottom of a glass containing coconut milk, water, food coloring. Stars: salt, cinnamon, baking powder, Tums. Navid Baraty hide caption

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Navid Baraty

This NASA file image shows a true color photo of Saturn assembled from images collected by Voyager 2. HO/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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HO/AFP/Getty Images

Exploring The Solar System Through The Eyes Of Robotic Voyagers

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Australia's giant Parkes radio telescope detected a "fast radio burst," or FRB, last May. Researchers call FRBs, whose origins haven't been explained, "tantalizing mysteries of the radio sky." CSIRO/EPA/Landov hide caption

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CSIRO/EPA/Landov

A negative image of Kks3, made using the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. The core of the galaxy is the right hand dark object at the top center of the image. D. Makarov/Royal Astronomical Society hide caption

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D. Makarov/Royal Astronomical Society