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The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft break apart shortly after liftoff from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla., on June 28. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said Monday the failure of a steel strut likely caused the rocket to explode. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

Harry Kroto, pictured in 1996, displays a model of the geodesic-shaped carbon molecules that he helped discover. Michael Scates/AP hide caption

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Michael Scates/AP

'Buckyballs' Solve Century-Old Mystery About Interstellar Space

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The new spacecraft, called LightSail, is orbiting Earth. Future versions could travel to the moon and beyond. The Planetary Society hide caption

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The Planetary Society

Solar Sail Unfurls In Space

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The view of the universe known as the Hubble Deep Field, presented in 1996, shows classical spiral and elliptical shaped galaxies, as well as a variety of other galaxy shapes. NASA/AP hide caption

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NASA/AP

Astronomer Chris Impey examines the possibilities of the universe in his new book Beyond. "I like the idea that the universe — the boundless possibility of 20 billion habitable worlds — has led to things that we can barely imagine," he says. In the 1970s, NASA Ames conducted several space colony studies, commissioning renderings of the giant spacecraft which could house entire cities. Rick Guidice/NASA Ames Research Center hide caption

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Rick Guidice/NASA Ames Research Center

The Great 'Beyond': Contemplating Life, Sex And Elevators In Space

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An image of the galaxy EGS-zs8-1, which set a new distance record after researchers determined it was more than 13 billion light-years away. NASA, ESA, P. Oesch, and I. Momcheva, and the 3D-HST and HUDF09/XDF teams hide caption

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NASA, ESA, P. Oesch, and I. Momcheva, and the 3D-HST and HUDF09/XDF teams