space space

The Apollo 11 space module floating above the moon. Next-generation space queries may tend toward the political: Do the extraterrestrial beings have political action committees? Are there extraterrestrial lobbyists? Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Keystone/Getty Images

Close Encounters With Congress?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/559143650/559215327" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

David Reitze of the California Institute of Technology and the executive director of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO, speaks at the National Press Club in Washington on Oct. 16. He talks of one of the most violent events in the cosmos, the collision of neuron stars, that was witnessed completely for the first time in August. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Walsh/AP

An annual space law moot court competition imagines a future legal case set in space, where issues of liability and sovereignty can get extra complicated. Stocktrek Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stocktrek Images/Getty Images

An Accident On The Moon, Young Lawyers To The Rescue

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/550213230/552987127" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"It's not just about making one German astronaut happy with fresh bread," Marcu explains. "There's really a deeper meaning to bread in space." Above, a photo illustration of bread in space. NASA/ Bake in Space GmbH hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/ Bake in Space GmbH

Astronaut Reid Wiseman captured this image from the International Space Station and posted it on Sept. 28, 2014, writing: "The Milky Way steals the show from Sahara sands that make the Earth glow orange," according to NASA's website. Reid Wiseman/NASA hide caption

toggle caption
Reid Wiseman/NASA

Trent Barton, a volunteer for the study looking at pressure inside the brain during space flights. Courtesy of David Ham hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of David Ham

Doctor Launches Vision Quest To Help Astronauts' Eyeballs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/518214299/518462058" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

SpaceX says its Falcon Heavy rocket, shown here in an artist's rendering, will be used in the mission to the moon. SpaceX hide caption

toggle caption
SpaceX

SpaceX Announces Plans To Send Two Customers To The Moon

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/517579221/517657461" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket sits on the launch pad Saturday at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. SpaceX scrubbed the Saturday launch due to a technical issue. The company is tried again — and succeeded — on Sunday. Bruce Weaver/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bruce Weaver/AFP/Getty Images

Scientists used the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array near Socorro, N.M., to detect fast radio bursts. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

Portrait Of U.S. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr. in 1998, when he served as Payload Specialist For Space Shuttle Sts-95. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/Getty Images

John Glenn, First American To Orbit The Earth, Dies At 95

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/252101790/504865064" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript