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Deana Quczada of Honduras has been camping with her young children on the street in Tijuana for several days. Going back to the violence in her home country is not an option, she says. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

In this frame from a video, a member of the National Guard watches over Rio Grande River on the border in Roma, Texas, on Tuesday. The deployment of National Guard members to the U.S.-Mexico border at President Trump's request was underway Tuesday with a gradual ramp-up of troops under orders to help curb illegal immigration. John Mone/AP hide caption

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John Mone/AP

Retired Lt. Gen. H Steven Blum, left, and former assistant defense secretary Paul McHale, center, visit Utah National Guard troops as they extend a border fence in San Luis, Ariz., in 2006. Khampha Bouaphanh/AP hide caption

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Khampha Bouaphanh/AP

Former National Guard Chief On What A 2006 Border Deployment Tells Us Today

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Being in rural places means potential patients may often be isolated, low-income and not have easy access to transportation — and therefore difficult to serve. Christina Chung for NPR hide caption

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Christina Chung for NPR

In A Border Region Where Immigrants Are Wary, A Health Center Travels To Its Patients

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A U.S. Border Patrol agent questions a man in Nogales, Ariz., seen through a hole in a metal fence marking the border between the U.S. and Mexico, in 2007. Guillermo Arias/Associated Press hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/Associated Press

Irma and Oscar Sanchez were apprehended by the Border Patrol when they took their infant son, Isaac, to a children's hospital to have emergency surgery. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Border Patrol Arrests Parents While Infant Awaits Serious Operation

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Maria Guadalupe Guereca, 60, visits the grave of her son Sergio Hernandez Guereca at the Jardines del Recuerdo cemetery in Juarez, Mexico, earlier this year. Her son was shot by a U.S. agent across the border in 2010. Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images

Orlando, whose nickname is the Wolf, is a human smuggler in Matamoros who says far fewer people want to employ his services and jump the border, with the Trump administration. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Illegal Border Crossings Are Down, And So Is Business For Smugglers

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A view from the International bridge between Presidio, Texas, and Ojinaga, Mexico, shows the flooded checkpoint between the two cities on Sept. 17, 2008. A levee broke and water from the Rio Grande inundated parts of the city with 10 feet of water. Walt Frerck/AP hide caption

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Walt Frerck/AP

Mexico Worries That A New Border Wall Will Worsen Flooding

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Victor Pizarro runs a taxi company in Plattsburgh, N.Y., about 20 miles from the Canadian border. Since January, several people have asked to be driven to a road near the border. Ashley Cleek for NPR hide caption

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Ashley Cleek for NPR

A Taxi Driver's Mission To Help Refugees Reach The Canadian Border

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Attorney Bob Hilliard — representing the family of Mexican teenager Sergio Adrian Hernandez, who was shot and killed by a U.S. Border Patrol agent — speaks in front of the Supreme Court after presenting his argument on Tuesday. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Conservative Justices Skeptical Of Extending Constitution Beyond U.S. Border

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Relatives of Sergio Hernández sit in Ciudad Juarez at the U.S.-Mexico border, on the second anniversary of his killing in 2012. Jesus Alcazar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jesus Alcazar/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court To Decide If Mexican Nationals May Sue For Border Shooting

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Mother Jones reporter Shane Bauer went undercover with the Three Percent United Patriots border militia group. Winni Wintermeyer/Courtesy of Mother Jones hide caption

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Winni Wintermeyer/Courtesy of Mother Jones

What A Reporter Learned When He Infiltrated An Arizona Militia Group

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An undated still image shows men at a Tucson facility wrapped in Mylar sheets and sitting on concrete floors and benches. CBP/American Immigration Council hide caption

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CBP/American Immigration Council

Diego next to posters of his brother Jose. The agent involved in Jose's death will be the first ever charged with murder for a cross-border shooting. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

In A First, Border Agent Indicted For Killing Mexican Teen Across Fence

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A car filled with bales of marijuana is seen at a police station in La Grulla, Texas, in 2013. A lot of drugs pass through the Border Patrol inspection station in Brooks County, where La Grulla is located; it, too, is refusing to take checkpoint cases. Eric Thayer/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Reuters/Landov

At 'Checkpoint Of The Stars,' Texas Sheriff Takes A Pass On Pot Cases

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