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Darling Adalid Mercado, 19 (center), left his home in Ocotepeque, Honduras, three months ago to flee town thugs who wanted to recruit him. Guillermo Arias for NPR hide caption

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Guillermo Arias for NPR

A Waiting Game For Immigrants And Border Agents On 2 Sides Of The Wall

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Family and friends of the four slain women gathered for a candlelight vigil at a park in downtown Laredo, Texas, in September. Juan David Ortiz has pleaded not guilty to charges of capital murder. Susan Montoya Bryan/AP hide caption

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Susan Montoya Bryan/AP

Chief Patrol Agent Rodney Scott stands near an old border monument at the base of the San Ysidro Mountains in southern San Diego County where current fencing ends. John Francis Peters for NPR hide caption

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John Francis Peters for NPR

Border Patrol Makes Its Case For An Expanded 'Border Barrier'

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Dr. Bert Johansson, an El Paso pediatrician, treats lesions on a migrant man's foot at a makeshift clinic within a local shelter. Monica Ortiz Uribe/NPR hide caption

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Monica Ortiz Uribe/NPR

It's Easy For Migrants To Get Sick; Harder To Get Treatment

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Neighbors carry the coffin that contains the body of Jakelin Caal Maquin into her grandparents' home in San Antonio Secortez, Guatemala. The 7-year-old girl died while in the custody of the U.S. Border Patrol. Oliver de Ros/AP hide caption

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Oliver de Ros/AP

Pediatricians Voice Concerns About Care Following Two 'Needless' Migrant Deaths

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Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen announced a host of "extraordinary protective measures" designed to improve conditions for children and adults held in U.S. Customs and Border Protection custody. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Migrants, one carrying a child, who plan to turn themselves over to U.S. border agents, walk up the embankment after climbing over a U.S. border wall from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, last week. On Tuesday, members of the Hispanic Caucus called for improved medical facilities and trained personnel at ports of entry. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

Central American migrants walk along the U.S. border fence looking for places to cross, in Tijuana, Mexico. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

7-Year-Old Migrant Girl Dies Of Dehydration And Shock In U.S. Border Patrol Custody

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Jobs with CBP have been notoriously difficult to fill, in large part because of the polygraph exam applicants are required to undergo. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Troops set up concertina wire as a Customs and Border Protection agent stands guard on the U.S. side of the border with Mexico, on Thanksgiving Day. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

Trump Is Expected To Extend U.S. Troops' Deployment To Mexico Border Into January

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The border fence separating Nogales, Ariz. from Nogales, Sonora, Mexico. In 2012 a Mexican teenager was shot and killed by a border patrol agent shooting through the fence. Last week, the agent was found not-guilty of involuntary manslaughter. Matt York/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Matt York/ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Sawmill Fire burned near Tucson, Ariz., in late April 2017. Not all views of the blaze were nearly so scenic as this one, shot at sunset by the Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management. Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management hide caption

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Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management

Vehicles wait for inspection at the Border Patrol's Laredo North vehicle checkpoint in Laredo, Texas. A border agent killed an immigrant woman in Rio Bravo, near Laredo on Wednesday. The shooting is being investigated by the Texas Rangers and the FBI. Nomaan Merchant/AP hide caption

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Nomaan Merchant/AP

Border Patrol Shooting Death Of Immigrant Woman Raises Tensions In South Texas

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Deana Quczada of Honduras has been camping with her young children on the street in Tijuana for several days. Going back to the violence in her home country is not an option, she says. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

In this frame from a video, a member of the National Guard watches over Rio Grande River on the border in Roma, Texas, on Tuesday. The deployment of National Guard members to the U.S.-Mexico border at President Trump's request was underway Tuesday with a gradual ramp-up of troops under orders to help curb illegal immigration. John Mone/AP hide caption

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John Mone/AP

Retired Lt. Gen. H Steven Blum, left, and former assistant defense secretary Paul McHale, center, visit Utah National Guard troops as they extend a border fence in San Luis, Ariz., in 2006. Khampha Bouaphanh/AP hide caption

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Khampha Bouaphanh/AP

Former National Guard Chief On What A 2006 Border Deployment Tells Us Today

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Being in rural places means potential patients may often be isolated, low-income and not have easy access to transportation — and therefore difficult to serve. Christina Chung for NPR hide caption

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Christina Chung for NPR

In A Border Region Where Immigrants Are Wary, A Health Center Travels To Its Patients

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A U.S. Border Patrol agent questions a man in Nogales, Ariz., seen through a hole in a metal fence marking the border between the U.S. and Mexico, in 2007. Guillermo Arias/Associated Press hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/Associated Press