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A search team looks for a 2-year-old girl who went missing in the Rio Grande near the border city of Del Rio, Texas. U.S. Customs and Border Protection hide caption

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, speaks alongside members of the Hispanic Caucus after touring the Border Patrol station in Clint, Texas, on Monday. Cedar Attanasio/AP hide caption

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Cedar Attanasio/AP

The entrance to the Border Patrol station in Clint, Texas, where reporters were given a tour following outrage over reports of unsanitary detention conditions for migrant children being housed at the Border Patrol facility near El Paso. Cedar Attanasio/AP hide caption

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Cedar Attanasio/AP

Rosa Ramírez cries as she looks at photos of her son Óscar Alberto Martínez Ramírez, 25, and granddaughter Valeria, nearly 2, while speaking to journalists at her home in San Martín, El Salvador, on Tuesday. The drowned bodies of her son and granddaughter were found Monday morning on the banks of the Rio Grande. Antonio Valladares/AP hide caption

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Antonio Valladares/AP

A sign is posted outside the U.S. Customs and Border Protection station in Clint, Texas, earlier this week, where lawyers reported that detained migrant children were held unbathed and hungry. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

The entrance of a Border Patrol station in Clint, Texas. U.S. Customs and Border Protection said the agency is removing children from the facility following reports of unsanitary conditions inside. Cedar Attanasio/AP hide caption

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Cedar Attanasio/AP

U.S. Border Patrol agents found four bodies near the Rio Grande river along Anzalduas Park, close to McAllen, Texas. In this file photo, a Border Patrol boat is seen on the river along Anzalduas Park. Shannon Stapleton/Reuters hide caption

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Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

Jugs of water for undocumented immigrants sit along migrant trails after being delivered by volunteers for the humanitarian aid group No More Deaths. The number of immigrant deaths, mostly due to dehydration and exposure, has risen as higher border security has pushed immigrant crossing routes into more remote desert regions. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Extending 'Zero Tolerance' To People Who Help Migrants Along The Border

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U.S. citizens use ropes to cross the Rio Grande from San Antonio del Bravo, Mexico, into Candelaria, Texas. U.S. citizens depend on the free health clinic in San Antonio del Bravo. Lorne Matalon for NPR hide caption

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Lorne Matalon for NPR

In Rural West Texas, Illegal Border Crossings Are Routine For U.S. Citizens

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A U.S. Border Patrol agent walks along the banks of the Rio Grande near McAllen, Texas. Migrant families often cross the river illegally to enter the U.S. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

In this 2016 photo, a man holds up his iPhone during a rally in support of data privacy outside the Apple store in San Francisco. Watchdog groups that keep tabs on digital privacy rights are concerned that U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents are searching the phones and other digital devices of international travelers at border checkpoints in U.S. airports. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Tim Foley, the founder of Arizona Border Recon and Maggie Milinovitch, the co-owner of La Gitana Cantina, both live in the small border town of Arivaca, Ariz. The recent militia group presence has put strains on a town that has long prided itself on its live-and-let-live, cooperative spirit. Dominic Valente for NPR hide caption

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Dominic Valente for NPR

Militias Test The Civility Of An Arizona Border Town

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A guard escorts a detained immigrant from his "segregation cell" back into the general population at the Adelanto Detention Facility in November 2013. Today the privately run ICE facility in Adelanto, Calif., houses nearly 2,000 men and women and has come under sharp criticism by the California attorney general and other investigators for health and safety problems. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Watchdogs Cite Lax Medical And Mental Health Treatment Of ICE Detainees

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Kirstjen Nielsen, then Homeland Security Secretary, testified on Capitol Hill before the House Homeland Security Committee in March. She said "cases of fake families are cropping up everywhere," among the surge of migrants at the Southern border. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Balloons hang over the coffin that contain the remains of 7-year-old Jakelin Caal Maquin during a memorial service in her grandparents' home in San Antonio Secortez, Guatemala, Monday, Dec. 24, 2018. Oliver de Ros/AP hide caption

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Oliver de Ros/AP

A Border Patrol agent checks the names and documents of families who crossed the nearby U.S.-Mexico border near McAllen, Texas. Immigration authorities say they expect the continuing surge of Central American families crossing the border to multiply in the coming months. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Migrants trudge along the border fence to a waiting bus after turning themselves in to the Border Patrol at the U.S.-Mexico border near El Paso, Texas. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

A Surge Of Migrants Strains Border Patrol As El Paso Becomes Latest Hot Spot

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Honduran migrants surrender to the U.S. Border Patrol after crossing a border wall into the United States. According to new federal data, the number of migrants apprehended crossing the border in recent months has surged. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Migrant Families Arrive In Busloads As Border Crossings Hit 10-Year High

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A yard sign in Ajo, Ariz., expressing support for migrant aid workers. Joel Rose/NPR hide caption

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Joel Rose/NPR

'No More Deaths' Volunteers Face Possible Jail Time For Aiding Migrants

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Children of Mexican immigrants wait to receive a free health checkup inside a mobile clinic at the Mexican Consulate in Denver, Colo., in 2009. The Trump administration wants to ratchet up scrutiny of the use of social services by immigrants. That's already led some worried parents to avoid family health care. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Fear Of Deportation Or Green Card Denial Deters Some Parents From Getting Kids Care

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Darling Adalid Mercado, 19 (center), left his home in Ocotepeque, Honduras, three months ago to flee town thugs who wanted to recruit him. Guillermo Arias for NPR hide caption

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Guillermo Arias for NPR

A Waiting Game For Immigrants And Border Agents On 2 Sides Of The Wall

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