Immigration Immigration
Stories About

Immigration

Carlos Catarldo Gomez, of Honduras, center, is escorted by Mexican officials after leaving the United States, the first person returned to Mexico to wait for his asylum trial date, in Tijuana, Mexico Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gregory Bull/AP

Children of Mexican immigrants wait to receive a free health checkup inside a mobile clinic at the Mexican Consulate in Denver, Colo., in 2009. The Trump administration wants to ratchet up scrutiny of the use of social services by immigrants. That's already led some worried parents to avoid family health care. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

Fear Of Deportation Or Green Card Denial Deters Some Parents From Getting Kids Care

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/686325494/688976867" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump's proposal to end the partial government shutdown includes not only funding for an expanded border wall, parts of which can be seen from Tijuana, Mexico, but also provisions that further restrict asylum seekers. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gregory Bull/AP

Honduran migrants wait in line to cross over the border checkpoint into Guatemala in Agua Caliente, Honduras. A new caravan of at least several hundred Hondurans has set off toward the United States on foot or in vehicles. Some have already crossed into Guatemala. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

An employee of Tokyo Electric Power Co. works at Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant to decontaminate the area after the 2011 nuclear meltdown. A Vietnamese laborer in Japan on a training program says he was also put to work cleaning up the site, but with inadequate gear. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

As Japan Tries Out Immigration, Migrant Workers Complain Of Exploitation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/683224099/688124732" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Asylum seekers stand at a bus stop after they were dropped off by Immigration and Customs Enforcement at the Greyhound bus station in El Paso, Texas on Dec. 23. Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen announced a host of "extraordinary protective measures" designed to improve conditions for children and adults held in U.S. Customs and Border Protection custody. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Walsh/AP

Gerald Champion Regional Medical Center in Alamogordo, New Mexico where an 8-year-old boy from Guatemala died in government custody on Monday U.S. Customs and Border Protection says. Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen looks at her papers while testifying before members of the House Judiciary Committee on Thursday in Washington, D.C. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

When thousands of Hondurans and other Central Americans poured into Tijuana, Aguilar knew he had to do something. "They're from the same streets and cities as us. They're family!" he says. "It wasn't up for discussion, it was simply a matter of going out there and getting these people fed with a taste of home." Tomás Ayuso for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Tomás Ayuso for NPR

U.S. Border Patrol next to the the border wall dividing Nogales, Ariz., and Nogales Mexico. Susan Schulman/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Schulman/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Opinion: What The Death Of A 7-Year-Old Migrant Says About This Country

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/676894328/677015832" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Naser al-Shimary, deported this year to Iraq from the U.S., greets his four-year-old son Vincent at Baghdad international airport. Shimary had lived in the U.S. since he was five years old. He agreed to be deported under a practice halted by a U.S. court this summer. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jane Arraf/NPR

'They Know I'm Different': Deportee Struggles In Iraq After Decades Living In U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/662218863/670877153" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Roy Daley, 74, with his wife, Ana Smith-Daley, 71, (left) and his daughter, Lucy Figueroa, 41, at StoryCorps in Austin, Texas. Savannah Winchester/StoryCorps hide caption

toggle caption
Savannah Winchester/StoryCorps

'An Opportunity To Be Thankful': Reflecting On A First Thanksgiving In The U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/669370342/670373353" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Rep. Ben Ray Lujan, D-N.M., Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee chairman, celebrate. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images