Immigration Immigration

Patrons of the the New World Mall in Flushing ride the escalator from the food court. The Queens neighborhood has become a hot spot for northern Chinese immigrants in the past few years. The trend has brought a cultural wave of influence on the food and business markets in the community. Cameron Robert/NPR hide caption

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Cameron Robert/NPR

Leaving China's North, Immigrants Redefine Chinese In New York

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President Obama announces executive actions on U.S. immigration policy during a nationally televised address from the White House in November 2014. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent detains an immigrant in October 2015. Though the Department of Homeland Security says it is looking for recent arrivals, criminals and people with deportation orders, that hasn't reassured immigrants like Giovanni. "It's still scary," he says. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Deportations, Rumors Stir Fear Among Immigrants

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Attendance Drops At Maryland High School, As Deportation Fears Rise

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A screenshot of Florida Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart Spanish-language response to the State of the Union address, which has a different message on immigration than the one in South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley's response speech. Conferencia GOP via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Conferencia GOP via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

Latino Reaction Split On Republicans' Spanish Language Message

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Former U.S. Marine Daniel Torres stands outside the Deported Veteran Support House, known as the The Bunker, in eastern Tijuana. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Service Members, Not Citizens: Meet The Veterans Who Have Been Deported

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Cranes pepper the skyline in Charlotte, N.C., a sign of the region's strong economic growth. Logan Cyrus for NPR hide caption

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Logan Cyrus for NPR

Economy And Immigration: What's Dividing Republicans

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Hilda Ramirez and her son, Ivan, are staying at a shelter home in Austin. They fear that Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents will come and arrest them any minute. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Central American Families Fear Deportation As Raids Begin

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A 2012 guide shows who's eligible for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. The original program, implemented by President Obama in 2012, has come under fire from many Republican presidential candidates — many of whom have promised to end it if elected to the White House. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

As 2016 Elections Loom, So Does A Possible End To DACA

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Lorella Praeli speaking to reporters at the White House in Dec. 2014. Praeli, who arrived in the U.S. as an undocumented immigrant, is now a top official in Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Can't Vote But Campaigning Hard For Presidential Candidates

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