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Asylum seekers stand at a bus stop after they were dropped off by Immigration and Customs Enforcement at the Greyhound bus station in El Paso, Texas on Dec. 23. Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen announced a host of "extraordinary protective measures" designed to improve conditions for children and adults held in U.S. Customs and Border Protection custody. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen looks at her papers while testifying before members of the House Judiciary Committee on Thursday in Washington, D.C. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

When thousands of Hondurans and other Central Americans poured into Tijuana, Aguilar knew he had to do something. "They're from the same streets and cities as us. They're family!" he says. "It wasn't up for discussion, it was simply a matter of going out there and getting these people fed with a taste of home." Tomás Ayuso for NPR hide caption

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Tomás Ayuso for NPR

U.S. Border Patrol next to the the border wall dividing Nogales, Ariz., and Nogales Mexico. Susan Schulman/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Susan Schulman/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Opinion: What The Death Of A 7-Year-Old Migrant Says About This Country

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Naser al-Shimary, deported this year to Iraq from the U.S., greets his four-year-old son Vincent at Baghdad international airport. Shimary had lived in the U.S. since he was five years old. He agreed to be deported under a practice halted by a U.S. court this summer. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

'They Know I'm Different': Deportee Struggles In Iraq After Decades Living In U.S.

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Roy Daley, 74, with his wife, Ana Smith-Daley, 71, (left) and his daughter, Lucy Figueroa, 41, at StoryCorps in Austin, Texas. Savannah Winchester/StoryCorps hide caption

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Savannah Winchester/StoryCorps

'An Opportunity To Be Thankful': Reflecting On A First Thanksgiving In The U.S.

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House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Rep. Ben Ray Lujan, D-N.M., Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee chairman, celebrate. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Mounted Border Patrol agents ride along a newly fortified border wall structure in Calexico, Calif. Funding for the border wall is one of a number of administration priorities that may face challenges if the Democrats flip the House. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP