Immigration Immigration

The Supreme Court says a lower court erred in its guidance to a jury about the standard for stripping a refugee of her American citizenship. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Demonstrators march in the Texas Capitol in Austin on Monday, protesting the state's newly passed anti-sanctuary cities bill, which empowers police to inquire about people's immigration status during routine interactions such as traffic stops. Meredith Hoffman/AP hide caption

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Meredith Hoffman/AP

Officer Jesus Robles (at right) and Officer Jason Cisneroz, community service officers in the Houston Police Department, have noticed that fewer unauthorized Latinos step forward to report crimes out of fear of deportation. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

New Immigration Crackdowns Creating 'Chilling Effect' On Crime Reporting

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Catalina Rodriguez-Lima runs a city office whose mission is to attract new immigrants to Baltimore, a strategy for reversing decades of population decline. Adrian Florido hide caption

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Adrian Florido

A wooden puzzle in the silhouette of a human head might look fun if the stakes weren't so high. A doctor named Howard Knox invented The Feature Profile Test — the formal name for this puzzle —after officials struggled to administer IQ tests to immigrants because of issues with language and literacy. Stephen Lewis/Art + Commerce/Smithsonian Magazine hide caption

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Stephen Lewis/Art + Commerce/Smithsonian Magazine

This Simple Puzzle Test Sealed The Fate Of Immigrants At Ellis Island

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Daniel Klein picks meat from crabs with the young daughter of a former strawberry picker in Oxnard, Calif., for an episode called "A Day In The Life." Courtesy of Perennial Plate hide caption

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Courtesy of Perennial Plate

Paulo Melo is a global entrepreneur-in-residence at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. This visa workaround allowed Melo, originally from Portugal, to legally stay in the United States and build his business in Massachusetts. Asma Khalid/Asma Khalid/WBUR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/Asma Khalid/WBUR

Without A Special Visa, Foreign Startup Founders Turn To A Workaround

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Indian workers and members of various trade unions dressed in red take part in a rally on the occasion of International Workers' Day in Bangalore on Monday. Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

People gather in the Pico-Union neighborhood of Los Angeles during rioting following the acquittal of four police officers in the beating of Rodney King in 1992. The neighborhood looks similar today as it did 25 years ago. It's still more than 80 percent Latino, with lots of immigrant families from Mexico and Central America. Gary Leonard/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Leonard/Corbis via Getty Images

As Los Angeles Burned, The Border Patrol Swooped In

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A Border Patrol agent looks over the U.S.-Mexico border wall in Calexico, Calif., on Jan. 31. Apprehensions at the southern border fell dramatically: from more than 40,000 per month late last year to 18,754 in February, and just 12,193 in March. Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images

In Trump's First 100 Days, A Dramatic Reduction In Immigration

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Zola Cervantes (center) and her brother, Tines, travel across the border regularly to visit their father, Gilbert, in Mexico. Courtesy of Misty Cervantes hide caption

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Courtesy of Misty Cervantes

With A Deported Father, California Teen Lives Life Between Borders

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A student uses notecards to learn facts about American government during a class at the public library in Brush, Colo. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media