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The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement processing center in Adelanto, Calif., is one of the detention facilities operated by GEO Group Inc. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California walks to the House floor Thursday. In a letter to Democratic lawmakers she announced the House would "reluctantly" pass a Senate version of an emergency immigration aid package. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

The Senate passed a $4.6 billion emergency humanitarian aid package Wednesday to cover the costs of the influx of migrants arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border. Mark Tenally/Associated Press hide caption

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Mark Tenally/Associated Press

Rosa Ramírez cries as she looks at photos of her son Óscar Alberto Martínez Ramírez, 25, and granddaughter Valeria, nearly 2, while speaking to journalists at her home in San Martín, El Salvador, on Tuesday. The drowned bodies of her son and granddaughter were found Monday morning on the banks of the Rio Grande. Antonio Valladares/AP hide caption

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Antonio Valladares/AP

President Trump, shown at an event in Montoursville, Pa., in May, is calling a rally in Orlando, Fla., on Tuesday a campaign kickoff. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Threatens To Deport 'Millions,' As He Kicks Off Campaign For Reelection

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Central American migrants and a Spanish journalist ride a makeshift raft across the Suchiate River from Tecún Umán in Guatemala to Ciudad Hidalgo in Chiapas state, Mexico, on June 11. Quetzalli Blanco/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Quetzalli Blanco/AFP/Getty Images

Mexico Is Overwhelmed By Asylum Claims As It Ramps Up Immigration Enforcement

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The Granville Street Bridge leads to downtown Vancouver, whose skyline of gleaming apartment towers hugging the waterfront is reminiscent of Hong Kong. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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Jackie Northam/NPR

Vancouver Has Been Transformed By Chinese Immigrants

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An abortion-rights supporter argues with an anti-abortion-rights protester in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on May 21 during demonstrations in defense of abortion rights. Anna Gassot/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Gassot/AFP/Getty Images

Tanisha Cortez waits on a table at a restaurant in Ames, Iowa. When the previous restaurant she worked for closed, Cortez applied to others and had job offers right away. Jobs are plentiful in Ames, a small city of more than 65,000 residents tucked amid farm fields north of Des Moines. Olivia Sun for NPR hide caption

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Olivia Sun for NPR

In This Town, You Apply For A Job And You Get It

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A lot of Iowa business owners in towns like Mount Pleasant are facing chronic labor shortages. One solution is to encourage more outsiders to come to the state, including immigrants. Jim Zarroli/NPR hide caption

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Jim Zarroli/NPR

With Workers Hard To Find, Immigration Crackdown Leaves Iowa Town In A Bind

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Drivers line up in the border city of Juárez in Mexico's Chihuahua state, as they attempt to cross the border at El Paso, Texas. The Guatemalan consul has confirmed that a Guatemalan boy apprehended with his mother last month had died Tuesday night. Herika Martinez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Herika Martinez/AFP/Getty Images

Vianeth Avila's husband, Cuban-born Jesus Avila, was detained by immigration officials at the airport as they returned from their honeymoon. In recent years, the U.S. government has taken a tougher stand against Cuban immigrants. Daniel Rivero/WLRN hide caption

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Daniel Rivero/WLRN

Cuban Immigrants Were Given A Haven In The U.S.; Now They're Being Deported

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An asylum-seeker rests outside El Chaparral port of entry while he waits for his turn to present himself to U.S. border authorities to request asylum, in Tijuana, Mexico, last month. A federal appeals court has granted the Trump administration's request to temporarily allow the government to continue to return asylum-seekers to Mexico while it appeals an ruling that blocked the policy. Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images