Immigration Immigration

Butler County Sheriff Richard Jones stands next to a illegal aliens sign he had placed in the parking lot of the Butler County Sheriff's Department, Nov. 3, 2005, in Hamilton, Ohio. David Kohl/AP hide caption

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David Kohl/AP

Tracing The Shifting Meaning Of 'Alien'

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a press conference Wednesday prior to a town hall meeting at Pinkerton Academy in Derry, N.H. Matthew Healey/UPI/Landov hide caption

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Matthew Healey/UPI/Landov

Will GOP's Efforts To Reach Out To Hispanics Survive These Primaries?

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Donald Trump wears what's become a campaign signature: his "Make America Great Again" hat. Part of making the country great again, Trump says, is implementing his hard-line immigration plan. Scott Heppell/AP hide caption

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Scott Heppell/AP

How Realistic Is Donald Trump's Immigration Plan?

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Donald Trump continues to lead in the polls and on Sunday released his first policy position — a conservative proposal on immigration. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Detainees at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Wash., gather for a Sikh prayer service. Liz Jones/KUOW hide caption

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Liz Jones/KUOW

With Religious Services, Immigrant Detainees Find 'Calmness'

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Tunde Wey gets ready to serve plantains and Jollof rice at his pop-up Nigerian dinner in the kitchen of Toki Underground, a ramen restaurant in Washington, D.C., in December 2014. Eliza Barclay/NPR hide caption

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Eliza Barclay/NPR

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

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Marta Elsie Leveron, 19, (left) and her brother Freddy David Leveron, 18, have not seen their father since he left El Savador to work in California in 1999. A new U.S. program allows families to reunite if one parent is a legal U.S. resident. The girl in the middle is Liliana Beatriz Leveron, 16, a cousin of the other two. Her parents are in the U.S. and she's seeking to reunite with them as well. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

A Father In California, Kids In El Salvador, And New Hope To Reunite

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