Immigration Immigration

Yuliana Rocha Zamarripa's workers' comp claim for a serious knee injury at work prompted her arrest. The mother of three spent the next year cycling through county and immigration jails. Scott McIntyre for ProPublica hide caption

toggle caption
Scott McIntyre for ProPublica

Yuliana Rocha Zamarripa's workers' comp claim for a serious knee injury at work prompted her arrest. She was shuffled from county to immigration jails for a year and blames the sexual abuse of her daughter on her inability to protect her at home. Scott McIntyre for ProPublica hide caption

toggle caption
Scott McIntyre for ProPublica

They Got Hurt At Work — Then They Got Deported

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543650270/543973349" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Protesters hold signs and chant at a rally for DACA in Washington, D.C. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
LA Johnson/NPR

Five Years In, What's Next For DACA?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543643821/543730345" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump, flanked by Sens. Tom Cotton, R-Ark. (left), and David Perdue, R-Ga., speaks in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on Wednesday during the unveiling of legislation that would place new limits on legal immigration. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

President Trump announces the introduction of the Reforming American Immigration for a Strong Economy (RAISE) Act with Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark. (left), and Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga., in the Roosevelt Room at the White House on Wednesday. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

In a "botched" investigation, Immigrations and Customs Enforcement kept Davino Watson, a U.S. citizen, imprisoned as a deportable alien for nearly 3 1/2 years. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

In this February photo released by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, agents arrest foreign nationals. According to a Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruling Monday, local law enforcement cannot honor ICE "detainers," which request that a person remain in custody who would otherwise be released. Charles Reed/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charles Reed/AP

Jennifer Ramirez and 14 other young women wearing quinceañera dresses protested on the south steps of the Texas State Capitol in Austin on Wednesday. They protested SB4, an immigration enforcement law. Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News hide caption

toggle caption
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

Desiree Armas (center) and her parents, Olga and Carlos Armas, left Peru when Desiree was 3 years old. Her immigration status made finding financial aid for college complicated. Joel Rose/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Joel Rose/NPR

For New Jersey DACA Student, The Road To College Is Bumpier Than Expected

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/536691320/537210508" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Supreme Court says a lower court erred in its guidance to a jury about the standard for stripping a refugee of her American citizenship. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images