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This photo shows an early-morning view of Halema'uma'u Crater and the Kilauea Caldera June 5, 2018. The volcano is no longer erupting but is still active. U.S. Geological Survey via AP hide caption

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U.S. Geological Survey via AP

The Volcano of Fire spewed lava and ash on Monday, as seen from Escuintla, Guatemala. Guatemalan authorities on Monday declared a red alert after the volcano erupted again, forcing thousands of residents to flee. Carlos Alonzo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Carlos Alonzo/AFP/Getty Images

Residents search for victims of the Fuego volcano eruption in the ash-covered village of San Miguel Los Lotes, in Escuintla, about 20 miles southwest of Guatemala City, on Thursday. Johan Ordonez /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johan Ordonez /AFP/Getty Images

Lilian Hernandez cries as she is comforted by her husband at the Mormon church that has been enabled as a shelter near Escuintla, Guatemala, on Tuesday. Hernandez lost 36 family members in all, missing and presumed dead in the town of San Miguel Los Lotes after the fiery volcanic eruption of the Volcan de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire, in south-central Guatemala. Oliver de Ros/AP hide caption

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Oliver de Ros/AP

People flee El Rodeo village, less than 30 miles from the capital, Guatemala City, after the eruption of the Fuego volcano on Sunday. Noe Perez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noe Perez/AFP/Getty Images

'Everything Is A Disaster': Guatemala's Fuego Volcano Erupts, Killing At Least 69

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Mount Paektu, which sits on the border with China, is known in North Korea as the "sacred mountain of revolution" and considered the legendary birthplace of Kim Jong Il and Korean culture. David Guttenfelder/AP hide caption

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David Guttenfelder/AP

North Korean Volcano Provides Rare Chance For Scientific Collaboration

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About 70 percent of Earth is covered by clouds at any given moment. Their interaction with climate isn't easy to study, scientists say; these shape-shifters move quickly. NOAA/Flickr hide caption

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NOAA/Flickr

Climate Change May Already Be Shifting Clouds Toward The Poles

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The eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines in 1991 spewed almost 20 million tons of sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere, causing worldwide temperatures to drop half a degree on average. Arlan Naeg/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Arlan Naeg/AFP/Getty Images

Scientific Pros Weigh The Cons Of Messing With Earth's Thermostat

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Mount Etna erupted on March 28, 1983. Lava flows destroyed homes and tourist destinations causing millions of dollars' worth of damage. Teams scrambled to divert the massive flow. Courtesy of John Lockwood hide caption

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Courtesy of John Lockwood

Diverting Lava Flow May Be Possible, But Some Hawaiians Object

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