bankruptcy bankruptcy

Maria Contreras-Sweet, former Small Business Administration Administrator, leads an investor group that is buying The Weinstein Co. Paul Morigi/Paul Morigi/Invision/AP hide caption

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Paul Morigi/Paul Morigi/Invision/AP

The Weinstein Co. says it will file for bankruptcy after plans for a sale fell apart. The ongoing legal ramifications from alleged sexual misconduct by founder Harvey Weinstein, seen here in January 2017, very likely played a role in the talks' failure. Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

The Toys R Us Times Square Holiday Shop held its grand opening last month in New York City. The largest U.S. toy store chain filed for bankruptcy protection late Monday, but most stores are operating as usual. Bennett Raglin/Getty Images for Toys R Us hide caption

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Bennett Raglin/Getty Images for Toys R Us

Legal issues — evictions, domestic violence, or insurance claim denials, for example — all too often can cascade into problems with bad medical outcomes. Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images

People carry a large Puerto Rican flag as they protest looming austerity measures amid an economic crisis in San Juan, Puerto Rico on Monday. The May Day demonstrations come as the island faces a Monday deadline for reaching a deal on debt payments, or entering bankruptcy-like proceedings. Danica Coto/AP hide caption

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Danica Coto/AP

Barbara Radley, of Oshkosh, Wis., has diabetes, liver failure and scleroderma. Even filing for bankruptcy early last year didn't stop her financial woes, she says. The medical bills keep piling up. Jason Houge for NPR hide caption

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Jason Houge for NPR

Medical Bills Still Take A Big Toll, Even With Insurance

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Detroit, after having billions of dollars of debt erased through bankruptcy, has emerged with a razor-thin financial cushion. Laura McDermott/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Laura McDermott/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Post-Bankruptcy, A Booming Detroit Is Still Fragile

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Mendocino, Calif., lures vacationing tourists and retirees. But the lone hospital on this remote stretch of coast, in nearby Fort Bragg, is struggling financially. David McSpadden/Wikimedia hide caption

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David McSpadden/Wikimedia

Mendocino Coast Fights To Keep Its Lone Hospital Afloat

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Milwaukee's Rancorous Catholic Church Abuse Case May Finally Be Settled

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Rev. Robert H. Schuller, pastor of the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, Calif., speaks at the church in 1996. Schuller, who hosted the top-rated Hour of Power telecast for decades, died Thursday at age 88. Michael Tweed/AP hide caption

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Michael Tweed/AP

Antoine Walker took a lot of 3-point shots during his NBA career, despite hitting them at a subpar rate. He also went bankrupt two years after retiring, despite collecting $110 million in salary during his playing career. Jim Bourg/Reuters/Corbis hide caption

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Jim Bourg/Reuters/Corbis