flooding flooding

Flooding in Boston's North End during a nor'easter storm on Friday. A new government report suggests floods will become more common over the next century. David L. Ryan/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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David L. Ryan/Boston Globe via Getty Images

New Report Predicts Rising Tides, More Flooding

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A family evacuated their apartment complex in west Houston, where high water coming from the Addicks Reservoir flooded the area after Hurricane Harvey on Aug. 30th. Erich Schlegel/Getty Images hide caption

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Erich Schlegel/Getty Images

Scientists Glimpse Houston's Flooded Future In Updated Rainfall Data

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Residents handle aftermath of hurricane with resilience, humor and spirit. Jaylyn Rosario stands on makeshift barrier to prevent flooding of her home on Avenida Esteves, piled high with sand and debris washed in from a creek. Carol Guzy for NPR hide caption

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Carol Guzy for NPR

Flooding in Immokalee, Fla., after Hurricane Irma hit was still present days afterward. Public health officials say that even after waters recede, issues such as mold and mosquitos can remain. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Whitlee Hurd, the mother of five children, walks through her damaged home in northeast Houston. "This is my child's room but I can't have them sleep here now because the window is open," she says. "We told the maintenance man but he won't help us." Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Christine Garcia relaxes with her 8-year-old daughter Mia in the Channelview High School gym. It's been turned into an evacuation shelter for victims of flooding from Harvey. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Houston School Superintendent Says A Lot Of Work Ahead To Open Schools

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Parts of Houston remain flooded, but most hospitals are up and running, according to Darrell Pile, CEO of the Southeast Texas Regional Advisory Council, which manages the catastrophic medical operations center in Houston. Marcus Yam/LA Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Yam/LA Times/Getty Images

In Houston, Most Hospitals 'Up And Fully Functional'

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Dwayne Boudreaux Jr., owner of the Circle Food Store in New Orleans, dumps out dirty water that was vacuumed up from the store on Monday, after severe flooding over the weekend. The city's pumps were not fully functional, officials now acknowledge. Boudreaux told a local news station that the last time he saw waters rise so high was during Hurricane Katrina. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Louisiana resident David Key rides away after reviewing the damage to his home. Federal officials have expanded a disaster declaration after flooding in the state damaged tens of thousands of homes and left nine people dead. Max Becherer/AP hide caption

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Max Becherer/AP

Louis Fernandez walks along a flooded Collins Avenue in Miami Beach in September 2015. The city is tackling sea-level rise by rebuilding roads and installing new storm sewers and pumps. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

As Waters Rise, Miami Beach Builds Higher Streets And Political Willpower

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