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flooding

A man stands in mud in the city of Mamulan in Iran's Lorestan Province. Heavy rain and unprecedented flooding has killed at least 70 people in Iran since mid-March. HOSSEIN MERSADI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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HOSSEIN MERSADI/AFP/Getty Images

Tom Wilke, his son Chad, and Nick Kenny launch a boat into the swollen waters of the Elkhorn River to check on Wilke's flooded property, in Norfolk, Neb., on Friday, March 15. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

A house is surrounded by flood water in Lumberton, N.C., on Monday. Alex Edelman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Edelman/AFP/Getty Images

Florence Death Toll Rises To 32 As Rivers Continue To Flood In N.C. And S.C.

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Wild rice grows along the edges of the Kakagon River in Wisconsin. Joe Proudman/Courtesy of University of California Davis hide caption

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Joe Proudman/Courtesy of University of California Davis

Climate Change Threatens Midwest's Wild Rice, A Staple For Native Americans

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A screenshot from a video posted by the City of Lynchburg shows water flowing over Lakeside Drive, which runs atop the College Lake Dam in the Virginia city. City of Lynchburg via Facebook/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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City of Lynchburg via Facebook/Screenshot by NPR

Debris and cars clog the Patapsco River in Ellicott City, Md., after flooding on May 27 that killed one person and destroyed much of the town's Main Street. David McFadden/AP hide caption

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David McFadden/AP

More Rain, More Development Spell Disaster For Some U.S. Cities

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After Hurricane Harvey hit the Texas coast in August 2017, the storm stalled over Houston and dumped as much as 60 inches of rain on some parts of the region. Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

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Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Hurricanes Are Moving More Slowly, Which Means More Damage

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Flooding in Boston's North End during a nor'easter storm on Friday. A new government report suggests floods will become more common over the next century. David L. Ryan/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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David L. Ryan/Boston Globe via Getty Images

New Report Predicts Rising Tides, More Flooding

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A family evacuated their apartment complex in west Houston, where high water coming from the Addicks Reservoir flooded the area after Hurricane Harvey on Aug. 30th. Erich Schlegel/Getty Images hide caption

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Erich Schlegel/Getty Images

Scientists Glimpse Houston's Flooded Future In Updated Rainfall Data

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Residents handle aftermath of hurricane with resilience, humor and spirit. Jaylyn Rosario stands on makeshift barrier to prevent flooding of her home on Avenida Esteves, piled high with sand and debris washed in from a creek. Carol Guzy for NPR hide caption

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Carol Guzy for NPR