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An exchange shop displays rates for various currencies in downtown Tehran last month. Iran is bracing for the restoration of U.S. sanctions on its vital oil industry set to take effect on Monday, as it grapples with an economic crisis that has sparked sporadic protests over rising prices, corruption and unemployment. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

Reimposing Sanctions Will Hasten End Of Iran Nuclear Deal, Some Experts Warn

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The U.S. is sanctioning China's military for buying equipment from Russia that included fighter jets and surface-to-air missiles. Russian President Vladimir Putin (right) is show with Chinese President Xi Jinping, in Russia earlier this month. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A member of the Myanmar security forces stands guard near a military transport helicopter in Rakhine state last September, about a month into the bloody crackdown on the country's Rohingya Muslim population. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

The sun sets behind an oil pump in the desert oil fields of Sakhir, Bahrain. OPEC nations agreed to reduce their production, but energy experts say that renewed U.S. sanctions on Iran could derail their supply cut deal. Hasan Jamali/AP hide caption

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Hasan Jamali/AP

Putin (left) and Schroeder attend a test pipeline launch at a gas compressor station outside Vyborg, in western Russia, in September 2011. Alexei Nikolsky/AP Photo/RIA Novosti hide caption

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Alexei Nikolsky/AP Photo/RIA Novosti

Schroeder Putin

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Russian politician Alexander Torshin, with Russian leader Vladimir Putin, is one of a number of powerful Russians sanctioned by the United States on Friday. Konstantin Zavrazhin/Getty Images hide caption

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Konstantin Zavrazhin/Getty Images

President Trump speaks on the South Lawn of the White House on Friday shortly before he announced new sanctions against North Korea. The measures are designed to prevent shipping companies from evading existing measures by sending prohibited goods to the country. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Sozcu, a Turkish daily newspaper seen in Ankara, runs Mehmet Hakan Atilla's conviction as front-page news on Thursday. Altan Gocher/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Altan Gocher/NurPhoto via Getty Images

An undated picture released by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency on Sept. 16 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un inspecting a launching drill of the Hwasong-12 ballistic missile at an undisclosed location. Kim vowed to complete North Korea's nuclear force despite sanctions, state media reported. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. To Impose More Sanctions On North Korea, But How Effective Will They Be?

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Ten Chinese and Russian companies as well as six individuals are targeted by a new round of U.S. sanctions aimed at curbing Pyongyang's weapons program. This follows a round of U.N. sanctions. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

Trump Administration Unveils Sanctions To Curb North Korea's Weapons Program

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Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev attends a Cabinet meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow last month. Alexei Nikolsky/AP hide caption

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Alexei Nikolsky/AP

President Trump signs the Veterans Choice Program Extension and Improvement Act at the White House in April. When they sign legislation, presidents can issue a "signing statement" to share their legal interpretation of the new law. Trump did so with the Russia sanctions law. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Like Presidents Past, Trump Adds A Signing Statement To A Bill He Doesn't Like

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President Trump meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Group of 20 summit in early July. It's unclear how the sanctions Trump signed into law Wednesday will affect the personal relationship between the two men. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Russia has given the U.S. a deadline to stop using a property in Serebryany Bor, in part of its response to Congress approving a new sanctions bill. Alexander Nemenov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Nemenov/AFP/Getty Images

Venezuelans began blocking deserted streets Wednesday as the opposition held a two-day strike opposing President Nicolas Maduro's planned vote for a new Constituent Assembly. A banner reading "The Constituent Is Hunger," is seen in Caracas' Petare neighborhood on Wednesday. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images

House Votes To Impose New Russia Sanctions — And Also Tie Trump's Hands

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House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy says the sanctions will show those who work against America's interests that their "actions have consequences." Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc.

The U.S. Treasury's Office of Foreign Asset Control says that Exxon Mobil must pay a $2 million penalty for allegedly violating sanctions on Russia. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP