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In a new book The Joy of Movement: How Exercise Helps Us Find Happiness, Hope, Connection, and Courage, author Kelly McGonigal argues that we should look beyond weight loss to the many social and emotional benefits of exercise. Boris Austin/Getty Images hide caption

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Boris Austin/Getty Images

Shannon Goyette visits her son Jacob's grave in Shirley, Mass. The 16-year-old died by suicide last year. Meredith Nierman/WGBH hide caption

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Meredith Nierman/WGBH

Massachusetts Case Probes The Role Schools Play In Teen Suicide Prevention

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RK workers depart a bus on their way to the job site at a new airport under construction in Salt Lake City. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

A Construction Company Embraces Frank Talk About Mental Health To Reduce Suicide

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Arline Feilen (left) and her sister, Kathy McCoy, at their mother's home in the Chicago suburbs. The biggest chunk of Feilen's bill was $16,480 for four nights in a room shared with another patient. McCoy joked that it would have been cheaper to stay at the Ritz-Carlton. Alyssa Schukar for KHN hide caption

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Alyssa Schukar for KHN

A Woman's Grief Led To A Mental Health Crisis And A $21,634 Hospital Bill

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Meme, a New Hampshire woman using a family nickname, ended up spending 20 days locked inside a wing of the emergency department at St. Joseph Hospital in Nashua, N.H. Courtesy of Meme hide caption

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Courtesy of Meme

Woman Detained In Hospital For Weeks Joins Lawsuit Against New Hampshire

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ISIS attacks abroad and a series of deadly right-wing attacks in the U.S. have fueled a demand for more information on extremist networks. Understanding them is the first step in fighting them. But there has been little discussion about potential harm to the researchers tasked with looking deep inside the world's most dangerous movements. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

'It Gets To You.' Extremism Researchers Confront The Unseen Toll Of Their Work

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With suicides on the rise, the government wants to make the national crisis hotline easier to use. A proposed three-digit number — 988 — could replace the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP

Dr. Abdul Subhan, a psychiatrist, at Meridian Health Services in Indiana, connects with patients over the Internet. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

Telepsychiatry Helps Recruitment And Patient Care In Rural Areas

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John Poynter of Clarksville, Tenn., uses a wall calendar to keep track of all his appointments for both behavioral health and physical ailments. His mental health case manager, Valerie Klein, appears regularly on the calendar — and helps make sure he gets to his diabetes appointments. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Coordinating Care Of Mind And Body Might Help Medicaid Save Money And Lives

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(From left) Sam Adamson, Lori Riddle, Hailey Hardcastle, and Derek Evans pose at the Oregon State Capitol in Salem. The teens suggested legislation to allow students to take "mental health days" as they would sick days. Jessica Adamson/AP hide caption

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Jessica Adamson/AP

A scene in the show 13 Reasons Why that had shown actress Katherine Langford's character taking her own life has been edited out. Richard Shotwell/Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP hide caption

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Richard Shotwell/Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

Nicole Rikard's husband, John Rikard, died by suicide in 2015. She talks with three other widows of police suicide every day. Eslah Attar for NPR hide caption

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Eslah Attar for NPR

After Husbands' Suicides, 'Best Widow Friends' Want Police Officers To Reach For Help

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A file photo shows the campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. Dr. Anthony Rostain, co-author of The Stressed Years of Their Lives, says today's college students are experiencing an "inordinate amount of anxiety." Lisa Poole/AP hide caption

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Lisa Poole/AP

College Students (And Their Parents) Face A Campus Mental Health 'Epidemic'

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Chris Nickels for NPR

How The Brain Shapes Pain And Links Ouch With Emotion

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Prisoners stand in a crowded lunch line at Elmore Correctional Facility in Elmore, Ala. in June 2015. On Saturday, a U.S. District Court Judge determined the state's Department of Corrections had not adequately addressed a spike in prisoner suicides. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

Damaged power lines hang over a street after Hurricane Irma hit the U.S. Virgin Islands on Sept. 6, 2017. That same month, another Category 5 hurricane hit the U.S. territory. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AP

After 2 Hurricanes, A 'Floodgate' Of Mental Health Issues In U.S. Virgin Islands

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Trying to make the world a better place: (left to right) Skoll Award winners Gregory Rockson of mPharma, Nicola Galombik and Maryana Iskander of Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator, Nancy Lublin of Crisis Text Line, Bright Simons of mPedigree and Julie Cordua of Thorn. Greg Smolonski/Skoll hide caption

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Greg Smolonski/Skoll
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