mental health : Shots - Health News mental health

A week ago, kids in Parkland, Fla., were talking about prom and graduation. Now they're talking about funerals and gun control. Some students say the shooting that left 17 people dead will be a catalyst for different gun laws. Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio hide caption

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Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio

Florida Students Shaken Over Shooting Plan To March In D.C.

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Matilde Gonzalez (left) and Cesar Calles hold their son, Cesar Julian Calles, 10 months old, as he is immunized with a flu shot in January at Sea Mar Community Health Center in Seattle. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

After Charleston chef Ben Murray committed suicide, Mickey Bakst (left) and Steve Palmer (right) started a support group for those in the restaurant business struggling with addiction. Andrew Cebulka/Phase: 3 Marketing and Communications hide caption

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Andrew Cebulka/Phase: 3 Marketing and Communications

President Donald Trump shakes hands with White House physician Rear Adm. Dr. Ronny Jackson following his annual physical at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., on Friday Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

(Left to right) Donald Trump, Abraham Lincoln and then vice presidential-candidate Richard Nixon (Left to right) Drew Angerer/Getty Images; National Archive/Getty Images; Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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(Left to right) Drew Angerer/Getty Images; National Archive/Getty Images; Keystone/Getty Images

Why Mental Health Is A Poor Measure Of A President

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Researchers found a sudden increase in teens' symptoms of depression, suicide risk factors and suicide rates in 2012 — around the time when smartphones became popular, researcher Jean Twenge says. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

The Risk Of Teen Depression And Suicide Is Linked To Smartphone Use, Study Says

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

Tylenol May Help Ease The Pain Of Hurt Feelings

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When the Northville Psychiatric Hospital closed, many of the patients either had to leave southeast Michigan for hospitals elsewhere in the state or ended up in community programs that haven't always met their needs, an advocacy group says. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Light Therapy Might Help People With Bipolar Depression

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At a press conference in Japan on Monday, President Donald Trump blamed mental illness, not guns, for the Texas massacre. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Texas Shooter's History Raises Questions About Mental Health And Mass Murder

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Brain Patterns May Predict People At Risk Of Suicide

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

Alexa, Are You Safe For My Kids?

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Dogs may not wash their paws compulsively, but some humans and canines have similar genetic mutations that may influence obsessive behavior. Ute Grabowsky/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Ute Grabowsky/Photothek via Getty Images

Anxiety-based school refusal affects 2 to 5 percent of school-age children. Some schools are employing new strategies to help these students overcome their symptoms. Anna_Isaeva/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Anna_Isaeva/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Staying healthy and knowing how to find good health care is a big challenge for college freshmen leaving home for the first time. Mauro Grigollo/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Mauro Grigollo/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Reporter Andrea Petersen's personal reflections are threaded through her account of the science of anxiety and of fresh ways the medical community is devising to help sufferers of anxiety. kieferpix/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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kieferpix/Getty Images/iStockphoto