mental health : Shots - Health News mental health

Americans are increasingly taking multiple drugs. And depression is a potential side effect of many of them. Glasshouse Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Glasshouse Images/Getty Images

1 In 3 Adults In The U.S. Takes Medications Linked To Depression

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The kids also learned handy visuals, like a remote control for negative thoughts so you can switch channels in your head. Nathalie Dieterle/for NPR hide caption

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Nathalie Dieterle/for NPR

To Teach Kids To Handle Tough Emotions, Some Schools Take Time Out For Group Therapy

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'Reluctant Psychonaut' Michael Pollan Embraces The 'New Science' Of Psychedelics

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Loneliness is on the rise in the U.S., particularly among younger people, such as members of Generation Z, born between the mid-1990s and the early 2000s, and millennials, just a little bit older. Tara Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Tara Moore/Getty Images

Cheryl Chandler says she happened to click on a viral video showing a woman wearing a hospital gown, not knowing it showed her 22-year-old daughter, Rebecca. She has mental health issues and was left outside a Baltimore hospital on a cold January night. The video recorded by a passer-by went viral. Jared Soares for NPR hide caption

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Jared Soares for NPR

'Failing Patients': Baltimore Video Highlights Crisis Of Emergency Psychiatric Care

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In her new book, Barbara Lipska describes surviving cancer that had spread to her brain, and how the illness changed her cognition, character and, ultimately, her understanding of the mental illnesses she studies. Courtesy of the author hide caption

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Courtesy of the author

'The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind' Returns From Madness

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Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine (center), is joined on Wednesday by Sen. Lindsey Graham (from left), R-S.C., Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, and Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore. Collins was pushing for provisions in the budget bill aimed at lowering premiums for people purchasing health insurance in the Affordable Care Act's marketplaces. That didn't happen. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Nearly 1 in 20 adults in the U.S. — some 13.6 million — live with some form of serious mental illness, but 60 percent of those adults received no mental health treatment in the past year. Sally Elford/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Sally Elford/Getty Images/Ikon Images
Sara Wong for NPR

Invisibilia: When Death Rocks Your World, Maybe You Jump Out Of A Plane

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Florida Gov. Rick Scott wants a range of measures aimed at preventing shootings like the one last week at a high school in Parkland, Fla. Scott is seen here during a meeting with law enforcement, mental health and education officials on Tuesday. Colin Hackley/Reuters hide caption

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Colin Hackley/Reuters

A week ago, kids in Parkland, Fla., were talking about prom and graduation. Now they're talking about funerals and gun control. Some students say the shooting that left 17 people dead will be a catalyst for different gun laws. Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio hide caption

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Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio

Florida Students Shaken Over Shooting Plan To March In D.C.

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An Afghan patient sits in a yard at the only mental health rehabilitation center in the city of Herat in April 2014. Aref Karimi /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aref Karimi /AFP/Getty Images

Jessica Porten went to a doctor's appointment with her daughter, Kira, to get help with postpartum depression. She soon found herself in the company of police who escorted her to a hospital's emergency department. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

Nurse Calls Cops After Woman Seeks Help For Postpartum Depression. Right Call?

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Matilde Gonzalez (left) and Cesar Calles hold their son, Cesar Julian Calles, 10 months old, as he is immunized with a flu shot in January at Sea Mar Community Health Center in Seattle. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

After Charleston chef Ben Murray committed suicide, Mickey Bakst (left) and Steve Palmer (right) started a support group for those in the restaurant business struggling with addiction. Andrew Cebulka/Phase: 3 Marketing and Communications hide caption

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Andrew Cebulka/Phase: 3 Marketing and Communications

President Donald Trump shakes hands with White House physician Rear Adm. Dr. Ronny Jackson following his annual physical at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., on Friday Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

(Left to right) Donald Trump, Abraham Lincoln and then vice presidential-candidate Richard Nixon (Left to right) Drew Angerer/Getty Images; National Archive/Getty Images; Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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(Left to right) Drew Angerer/Getty Images; National Archive/Getty Images; Keystone/Getty Images

Why Mental Health Is A Poor Measure Of A President

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Researchers found a sudden increase in teens' symptoms of depression, suicide risk factors and suicide rates in 2012 — around the time when smartphones became popular, researcher Jean Twenge says. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

The Risk Of Teen Depression And Suicide Is Linked To Smartphone Use, Study Says

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