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Toni Hoy, at her home in Rantoul, Ill., holds a childhood photo of her son, Daniel, who is now 24. In a last-ditch effort to get Daniel treatment for his severe mental illness in 2007, the Hoys surrendered parental custody to the state. "When I think of him, that's the picture I see in my mind. Just this adorable, blue-eyed, blond little sweetie," Hoy says. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

To Get Mental Health Help For A Child, Desperate Parents Relinquish Custody

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

If You Feel Thankful, Write It Down. It's Good For Your Health

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Offering therapy to children in need at school makes sense, says Sarah Nadeau, who adopted two girls from a family that struggled with addiction, because sometimes school is the only stable place they have. Getty Images hide caption

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Mourners comfort each other Thursday during a vigil at the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza for the victims of the mass shooting at Borderline Bar and Grill in Thousand Oaks, Calif. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Another Mass Shooting? 'Compassion Fatigue' Is A Natural Reaction

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Patients awaiting epilepsy surgery agreed to keep a running log of their mood while researchers used tiny wires to monitor electrical activity in their brains. The combination revealed a circuit for sadness. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Researchers Uncover A Circuit For Sadness In The Human Brain

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Jonny Sun emerges from behind his social character and navigates his space within the illustration world. Christopher Sun /Courtesy of Kovert Creative hide caption

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Christopher Sun /Courtesy of Kovert Creative

The cerebellum, a brain structure humans share with fish and lizards, appears to control the quality of many functions in the brain, according to a team of researchers. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

The Underestimated Cerebellum Gains New Respect From Brain Scientists

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Houses lie at the base of Colorado National Monument. The school district in Grand Junction knows it could take years to see whether their efforts towards suicide prevention have worked. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

How One Colorado Town Is Tackling Suicide Prevention — Starting With The Kids

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

A New Prescription For Depression: Join A Team And Get Sweaty

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Former Marine Josh Onan talks with George Kevin Flood, a staff psychiatrist at the San Diego VA. Onan is taking advantage of a year-old program that makes VA care available to people with less-than-honorable military discharges. Katie Schoolov/KPBS hide caption

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Katie Schoolov/KPBS

VA Struggles To Reach Other-Than-Honorable-Discharge Vets In Need Of Help

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A 12-year-old Iranian refugee girl, who had tried to set herself on fire with petrol, rests in a bed in Nauru, where nearly 1,000 refugees and asylum seekers have been sent by the government of Australia. Mike Leyral/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Leyral/AFP/Getty Images

A wildfire raged near the Moria refugee camp, pictured here, on Greece's Lesbos Island. The camp is home to an estimated 9,000 migrants and refugees. ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images

Physicians face long hours, frustrating paperwork and sometimes difficult patients. But researchers aren't so clear on whether burnout is the right word to describe their problems. ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images

These PET scans show the normal distribution of opioid receptors in the human brain. A new study suggests ketamine may activate these receptors, raising concern it could be addictive. Philippe Psaila/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Psaila/Science Source
Veronica Grech/Getty Images

Panel: Doctors Should Focus On Preventing Depression In Pregnant Women, New Moms

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Emergency room doctors face long-term stress, making them especially prone to depression and suicide. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

When Doctors Struggle With Suicide, Their Profession Often Fails Them

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Abdul-Azeez Buba, 33, Borno, Nigeria: "Before Boko Haram attacked my community, I was a successful building engineer. I made a lot of money from constructing houses." Etinosa Yvonne Osayimwen/Courtesy of www.etinosayvonne.me hide caption

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Etinosa Yvonne Osayimwen/Courtesy of www.etinosayvonne.me
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mental health