Rick Scott Rick Scott

Green algae is seen in the St. Lucie River in Stuart, Fla. Local GOP Rep. Brian Mast is making legislation to deal with the algae problem a focus of his re-election campaign, as his Democratic opponent Lauren Baer criticizes him for doing "too little, too late." Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Toxic Algae Seeps Into Florida Congressional Races

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The company behind a privately funded passenger train line in Florida has proposed a route that would connect Orlando and Tampa. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

More than 150,000 Floridians had their voting rights restored during former Gov. Charlie Crist's four years in office. In the seven years since then, current Gov. Rick Scott has approved restoring voting rights to just over 3,000 people. VisionsofAmerica/Joe Sohm/Getty Images hide caption

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VisionsofAmerica/Joe Sohm/Getty Images

Felons In Florida Want Their Voting Rights Back Without A Hassle

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Florida Gov. Rick Scott joined a January event on the ongoing relief efforts for those affected by Hurricane Maria in Florida and Puerto Rico. With a growing bloc of voters from the island in Florida, the Republican Scott and Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson have been attacking each other over the issue of relief efforts in Puerto Rico in their high-stakes Senate campaign. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

At Issue In Florida Senate Campaign: Who's Fighting For Puerto Rico?

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Florida Gov. Rick Scott signs the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Public Safety Act on Friday. The legislation includes a number of gun restrictions and also permits school personnel who are not full-time teachers to be armed. Mark Wallheiser/AP hide caption

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Mark Wallheiser/AP

Some Republican lawmakers in Florida are calling on Gov. Rick Scott to remove Broward Sheriff Scott Israel. The sheriff (center) and Scott (right) are seen here on Feb. 15, the day after the shooting. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Florida Gov. Rick Scott wants a range of measures aimed at preventing shootings like the one last week at a high school in Parkland, Fla. Scott is seen here during a meeting with law enforcement, mental health and education officials on Tuesday. Colin Hackley/Reuters hide caption

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Colin Hackley/Reuters

As a state entity, the University of Florida had to permit Richard Spencer to speak. But its president urged students and staff to avoid the event and "shun" Spencer and his followers. Bernard Brzezinski/University of Florida hide caption

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Bernard Brzezinski/University of Florida

Aramis Ayala, state attorney for Orange and Osceola counties, is suing Florida Gov. Rick Scott for removing her from 23 pending homicide cases. She alleges this move is unconstitutional, having "deprived voters in the Ninth Judicial Circuit of their chosen State Attorney." Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images

Orange-Osceola State Attorney Aramis Ayala speaks with reporters about her decision to not pursue the death penalty during her administration. Renata Sago/WMFE hide caption

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Renata Sago/WMFE

Florida Gov. Removes State Attorney From Death Penalty Case

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Florida Gov. Rick Scott speaks Wednesday with reporters in Washington, D.C., after a meeting with Sylvia Burwell, head of the Department of Health and Human Services. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Former Florida Governor and Democratic candidate for Governor Charlie Crist during a televised debate with Republican Florida Governor Rick Scott at Broward College on Wednesday. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Democrat Charlie Crist, a former Republican governor of Florida (left), and Rick Scott, the current Republican governor of Florida, listen to the moderators during a gubernatorial debate on Friday. The two are facing off in a tight race that's fueling a barrage of negative campaign ads. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Florida Governor's Race: Familiar Faces, Big Money, Brutal Ads

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