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Nheb Thai, a Cambodian refugee who was deported from the U.S., serves a meal to other deportees in Battambang last year. Cambodia has taken in 566 deportees since inking a 2002 pact with the U.S. that opened the door for hundreds with criminal records to be repatriated. Tang Chhin Sothy /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tang Chhin Sothy /AFP/Getty Images

Naser al-Shimary, deported this year to Iraq from the U.S., greets his four-year-old son Vincent at Baghdad international airport. Shimary had lived in the U.S. since he was five years old. He agreed to be deported under a practice halted by a U.S. court this summer. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

'They Know I'm Different': Deportee Struggles In Iraq After Decades Living In U.S.

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Jakiw Palij immigrated to the U.S. in 1949. According to U.S. authorities, he concealed his Nazi service. Department of Justice hide caption

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Department of Justice

Alleged Nazi Labor Camp Guard Deported To Germany

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A screenshot of a video showing U.S. Border Patrol agents attempting to instruct an injured man to cross the U.S. border into Mexico, apparently violating international laws. NBC News/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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NBC News/Screenshot by NPR

African migrants leaving an Israeli government immigration office in Bnei Brak, Israel. Posters in Arabic and Tigrinya on the wall announce Israel's "voluntary departure" policy for Sudanese and Eritrean migrants. Daniel Estrin/NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin/NPR

Israel Gives African Asylum-Seekers A Choice: Deportation Or Jail

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A man walks beside posters with photos showing portraits of missing people, during a march to remember those who disappeared during the Guatemalan civil war, at the Plaza de la Constitution in Guatemala City on June 30, 2016. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

Immigrant Accused Of Guatemalan War Crimes May Be Deported

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Then-President Barack Obama in a 2015 meeting with a group of DREAMers, who received protection from Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. Obama reacted strongly to President Trump's reversal of the policy. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Zola Cervantes (center) and her brother, Tines, travel across the border regularly to visit their father, Gilbert, in Mexico. Courtesy of Misty Cervantes hide caption

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Courtesy of Misty Cervantes

With A Deported Father, California Teen Lives Life Between Borders

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ICE agents conduct an enforcement operation in Los Angeles in February. Charles Reed/U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement via AP hide caption

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Charles Reed/U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement via AP
Chelsea Beck/NPR

Sanctuary Churches: Who Controls The Story?

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Volunteers gather bags of groceries for people seeking assistance at a food pantry in Concord, Mass. Many groups that help low-income families get food aid say they've seen an alarming drop recently in the number of immigrants applying for help. Yoon S. Byun/Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Yoon S. Byun/Boston Globe/Getty Images

Deportation Fears Prompt Immigrants To Cancel Food Stamps

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Dr. Cesar Barba (right), a family physician at the UMMA Community Clinic's Fremont Wellness Center in South Los Angeles, treats Lourdes Flores Valdez, 42, for her diabetes and other health issues. Maya Sugarman/KPCC hide caption

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Maya Sugarman/KPCC

After escaping violence in El Salvador in 1984, Magdalena Rivas found refuge in Old Cambridge Baptist Church in Cambridge, Mass. More than 30 years later, she revisits the small chapel where she slept. Gabrielle Emanuel/WGBH hide caption

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Gabrielle Emanuel/WGBH

Religious Communities Continue The Long Tradition Of Offering Sanctuary

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Fearing Deportation, Families Plan For The Worst

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Customs and Border Protection agents stand at the San Ysidro Port of Entry on Friday, Feb. 10. One memorandum issued by the Department of Homeland Security says the government will hire new ICE officers and Border Patrol agents, but it doesn't mention hiring more immigration judges. Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images

Overwhelmed Courts Could Limit Impact Of Adding Immigration Officers

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Jeanette Vizguerra, a Mexican woman seeking to avoid deportation from the United States, speaks Wednesday as she holds her 6-year-old daughter, Zuri, during a news conference in a Denver church in which Vizguerra and her children have taken refuge. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Sanctuary Churches Brace For Clash With Trump Administration

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Family members and supporters of Guadalupe Garcia de Rayos gather at a news conference outside the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Phoenix on Thursday. Steve Fluty/AP hide caption

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Steve Fluty/AP

People attend an immigration rally outside the Supreme Court in June. Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Supreme Court To Consider How Long Immigrants May Be Detained Without Bond Hearing

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