Native Americans Native Americans

A wooden cross marks an unidentified U.S. Army grave at Fort Laramie, Wyo., as pictured in 2009. The Fort Laramie National Historic Site will host a gathering of Lakota people this weekend to commemorate an 1868 treaty with the U.S. government. Matt Joyce/AP hide caption

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Matt Joyce/AP

Amid Keystone XL Fight, The Lakota Treaty Of Fort Laramie Turns 150

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The USDA has been providing food aid in the form of canned, shelf-stable nonperishables to Native Americans for decades. Shana Novak/Getty Images hide caption

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Shana Novak/Getty Images

How Might Trump's Food Box Plan Affect Health? Native Americans Know All Too Well

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Tommy Rock received his Ph.D. from Northern Arizona University in the School of Earth Science and Environmental Sustainability. Rock grew up in Monument Valley and worked in the tourism industry before going away to college. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Navajo President: Go To College, Then Bring That Knowledge Home

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The Cleveland Indians have agreed to remove the Chief Wahoo logo, which for decades has been publicly protested as racist and offensive. "[T]he logo is no longer appropriate for on-field use in Major League Baseball," said Commissioner Rob Manfred. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Here's what archaeologists think the Upward Sun River camp in what is now central Alaska looked like 11,500 years ago. Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature hide caption

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Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature

Ancient Human Remains Document Migration From Asia To America

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Anna Whiting Sorrell, a member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes in northwest Montana, had hernia surgery a couple of years ago. The Indian Health Service picked up a part of the tab for the surgery but denied coverage for follow-up appointments. Mike Albans for NPR hide caption

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Mike Albans for NPR

Native Americans Feel Invisible In U.S. Health Care System

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By 1495, Christopher Columbus was in trouble. The riches he had imagined finding in Asia were not materializing in the New World, and the costs of his voyages were mounting. Sending indigenous people back to Europe as slaves became his solution. Heritage Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Heritage Images/Getty Images

An American Secret: The Untold Story Of Native American Enslavement

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Mohawk Club adviser Robin Logan (in back) watches as club members Amanda Rourke (from left), Keely Thompson-Cook, Landon Laffin and Mallory Sunday discuss their high school's Native American Day celebration. David Sommerstein/North Country Public Radio hide caption

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David Sommerstein/North Country Public Radio

Native American Students Fight Discrimination By Celebrating Their Heritage

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Many people who live in the Blue Gap-Tachee Chapter in northeastern Arizona remember when mining companies blasted uranium out of the Claim 28 site near their homes. Dust from mine explosions coated everything. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

For Some Native Americans, Uranium Contamination Feels Like Discrimination

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The village of Igiugig performed a traditional Yupik blessing dance following the reburial of 24 ancestors. Avery Lill/KDLG hide caption

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Avery Lill/KDLG

After 87 Years At The Smithsonian, Bones Of Alaska Natives Returned And Reburied

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