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Former Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke left the Trump administration amid unresolved ethics investigations. His department has been inundated by Freedom of Information requests and is now proposing a new rule which critics charge could limit transparency. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Interior Dept.'s Push To Limit Public Records Requests Draws Criticism

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A herd of bison grazes in the Lamar Valley of Yellowstone National Park on Aug. 3, 2016. The park's superintendent has bumped heads with the Trump administration over how many bison the park can sustain. Matthew Brown/AP hide caption

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Matthew Brown/AP

Arctic sea ice is seen from a NASA research aircraft on March 30, 2017, above Greenland. A top Interior Department scientist who tracks Arctic conditions says he was demoted by the Trump administration for speaking out on climate change. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Climate Scientist Says He Was Demoted For Speaking Out On Climate Change

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An ancient petroglyph panel is pocked with bullet holes. Some say increased federal protection is needed to prevent further damage and vandalism to areas like this one, which is now included in Bears Ears National Monument. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

With National Monuments Under Review, Bears Ears Is Focus Of Fierce Debate

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A beach near the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, which was expanded earlier this month, and is considered a sacred place by Native Hawaiians. Saul Loeb /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb /AFP/Getty Images

Boats battle a fire at the offshore oil rig Deepwater Horizon on April 21, 2010. On Thursday, the Interior Department released what it called "the most significant safety and environmental protection reforms the Interior Department has undertaken since Deepwater Horizon." U.S. Coast Guard/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Coast Guard/Getty Images

Solenex's proposed well site is on the land known as the Badger-Two Medicine. Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio

Tribe Says Drilling Project Would Have 'Heartbreaking' Consequences

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Interior Secretary Sally Jewell speaks in Anchorage, Alaska. The Obama administration is requiring companies that drill for oil and natural gas on federal lands to disclose chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing operations. Dan Joling/AP hide caption

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Dan Joling/AP