Census Bureau Census Bureau

The U.S. government is conducting a test run of the 2020 census in Rhode Island's Providence County, where many noncitizens living in Central Falls, R.I., say they're planning to avoid participating in the national head count. RussellCreative/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
RussellCreative/Getty Images

Many Noncitizens Plan To Avoid The 2020 Census, Test Run Indicates

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/610492880/610493193" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

John Gore, acting head of the Justice Department's civil rights division, (right) shakes hands with U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in Washington, D.C., in April. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

An envelope contains a test questionnaire for the 2020 census mailed to a resident in Providence, R.I., as part of the nation's only test run of the upcoming national headcount. A Trump administration plan to include a citizenship question on the 2020 census has prompted legal challenges from many Democratic-led states. Michelle R. Smith/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michelle R. Smith/AP

Signs sit behind the podium before the start of a press conference in New York City about the multi-state lawsuit to block the Trump administration from adding a question about citizenship to the 2020 census form. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Sen. Kamala Harris is among a group of Democratic senators calling for an hearing on the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

Wendy Becker (left) and Mary Norton of Providence, R.I., raise their hands after the 2006 Massachusetts court ruling that allowed same-sex couples from Rhode Island to marry in Massachusetts. For the 2020 census, the couple can choose the new response category for "same-sex husband/wife/spouse." Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Boston Globe/Getty Images

2020 Census Will Ask About Same-Sex Relationships

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/598192154/598192155" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

From left to right, Tommy Shiels, Dennis Hayden, John Houlihan and Thomas Ring attend the New York Irish Center's weekly luncheon for seniors in Queens, N.Y. Many attendees say they support the 2020 census asking white people about their origins. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

2020 Census Will Ask White People More About Their Ethnicities

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/582338628/582338629" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New citizens stand for the U.S. national anthem at a naturalization ceremony in Jackson, Miss., in September 2017. The Census Bureau is considering adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rogelio V. Solis/AP

A demonstrator carries a sign that says "More than 300,000 Negroes are Denied Vote in Ala" to protest then-Alabama Gov. George Wallace's visit to Indianapolis in 1964. The word "Negro" was widely used to describe black people in the U.S. during the early civil rights era. Bob Daugherty/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Bob Daugherty/AP

If the White House approves a proposal to change the way the government collects race and ethnicity data, white people in the U.S. may be asked to check off boxes about their ethnic background. On this 2010 census form, answering "white" was enough to respond to the race question. blackwaterimages/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
blackwaterimages/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross appears before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform to discuss preparing for the 2020 Census. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

'Many Challenges' Ahead For 2020 Census, Commerce Secretary Says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/557356911/557497046" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Copies of the 2010 Census forms are on display in Phoenix. The U.S. Census Bureau is no longer considering removing a question on sexual orientation from a marketing survey for the 2020 Census. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ross D. Franklin/AP

Job candidates take a tour of the Amazon fulfillment center in Robbinsville, N.J., during a job fair last month. The Census Bureau says increased employment is what's driving higher income numbers. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Julio Cortez/AP

Pedestrians walk through Rockefeller Center in New York City. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the Asian population recently grew by 3 percent to 21.4 million and people who identified as being of two or more races grew by 3 percent to 8.5 million. Armin Rodler/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Armin Rodler/Flickr