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People walk past the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., earlier this month. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Supreme Court conservatives seem likely to axe SEC enforcement powers

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Changpeng Zhao, widely known as CZ, will step down from Binance, the crypto company he founded in 2017, as part of a deal with the Department of Justice and U.S. regulators. Patricia De Melo Moreira/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patricia De Melo Moreira/AFP via Getty Images

Binance founder and CEO Changpeng Zhao poses during an interview at the technology startups and innovation fair in Paris on May 16, 2022. CZ and Binance are being sued by the SEC, in a legal battle that could help determine whether cryptocurrencies should adhere to market regulations. Eric Piermont/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Piermont/AFP via Getty Images

The future of crypto hinges on a fight between the SEC and a former burger flipper

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Securities and Exchange Commission Chair Gary Gensler listens during a meeting of top financial regulators at the U.S. Treasury Department on Oct. 3, 2022, in Washington, D.C. The SEC's lawsuit against crypto exchanges Binance and Coinbase this week are intended to bring both under the regulatory purview of the agency. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Wall Street's top cop is determined to bring crypto to heel. He just took a big shot

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Sam Bankman-Fried, then FTX's CEO, appeared before the House Financial Services Committee in December 2021. Its chairwoman, Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA), says she expects him to testify again soon. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Wringing its hands over FTX's collapse, Washington hopes to prevent more crypto pain

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk attends the start of production at Tesla's "Gigafactory" in Grünheide, southeast of Berlin, Germany, on March 22. The billionaire, who has run afoul of regulators before, is in their sights again as he tries to buy Twitter. It's raising questions about the Securities and Exchange Commission's ability to police the rich and powerful. Patrick Pleul/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Pleul/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Vice President Harris looks at a hyperwall during a climate change discussion at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., on Nov. 5 , 2021. The SEC unveiled new proposals on Monday requiring companies to disclose climate-related risks. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The SEC wants companies to disclose how climate change is affecting them

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Waves lap ashore near condo buildings in Sunny Isles, Fl., on Aug. 9, 2021. Rising sea levels are seen as one of the potential consequences of climate change and could impact areas such as Florida's Miami-Dade County. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A planned merger between former President Donald Trump's social media startup and a so-called special purpose acquisition company, or a shell company, is being investigated by regulators. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

From left to right: Sen. Cynthia Lummis, R-Wyoming; Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Gary Gensler; and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. All three are likely to play important roles as the country starts to shape regulations for cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images; Melissa Lyttle/Bloomberg/Getty Images; Graeme Jennings/Pool/Getty Images/Various hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images; Melissa Lyttle/Bloomberg/Getty Images; Graeme Jennings/Pool/Getty Images/Various

A big fight is brewing over cryptocurrencies. These are some key players to watch

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In this image from video provided by the House Financial Services Committee, Vlad Tenev, chief executive officer of Robinhood, testifies during a virtual hearing on GameStop in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 18. Robinhood is facing a range of lawsuits and potential regulary action as it gears up to make its Wall Street debut. Provided by House Financial Services Committee/AP hide caption

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Provided by House Financial Services Committee/AP

The Robinhood IPO Is Here. But There Are Doubts About Its Future

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Securities and Exchange Commission Co-Directors of Enforcement Stephanie Avakian and Steven Peikin speak during a news conference in 2018. Avakian and Peikin say their office is aggressively pursuing enforcement related to the coronavirus pandemic. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk has agreed to step down as chairman of the electric-car company as part of a settlement to resolve a securities fraud charge lobbed by the SEC on Thursday. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images