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Ex-Chicago Police Officer Sentenced To 81 Months For Laquan McDonald Murder

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A still from surveillance footage, released by the police department in Mesa, Ariz., shows officers surrounding a man after they punched him to the ground. Mesa Police Department/azfamily/YouTube hide caption

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Mesa Police Department/azfamily/YouTube

"I just panicked. I just, it was like my heart exploded," Rose Campbell told local WSB TV, after she was pulled from her vehicle and screamed at during an arrest over a traffic stop. Alpharetta Department of Public Safety hide caption

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Alpharetta Department of Public Safety

The video shows a white police officer choking a young tuxedo-clad man who is African-American, pushing him against a storefront and then slamming him to the ground outside a North Carolina Waffle House. Anthony Wall via Facebook/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Anthony Wall via Facebook/Screenshot by NPR

In this Aug. 25, 2017, image made from video and released by the Asheville, N.C., Police Department, Johnnie Jermaine Rush grimaces after officer Christopher Hickman overpowers Rush in a chokehold. Earlier this year, a shorter clip obtained by a newspaper sparked anger in the community and helped lead to a felony charge of assault by strangulation against former officer Hickman. Asheville Police Department via AP hide caption

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Asheville Police Department via AP

Demonstrators in Miami stand with tape reading, " I Can't Breathe," in 2014. The protest occurred after a grand jury in New York City declined to indict the police officers involved Eric Garner's death. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

'I Can't Breathe' Examines Modern Policing And The Life And Death Of Eric Garner

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Many Black Families Watching As 'Take A Knee' NFL Protests Continue

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Looters load up a car at the Viva shopping center near a billowing fire during the rioting that erupted in Los Angeles on April 29, 1992, after a jury found four Los Angeles Police Department officers not guilty in the beating of Rodney King. Ron Eisenbeg/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Eisenbeg/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

When LA Erupted In Anger: A Look Back At The Rodney King Riots

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Scenes from Let It Fall: Los Angeles 1982-1992. ABC Press hide caption

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ABC Press

5 Films Look At The Los Angeles Riots From (Almost) Every Angle

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Roman Ducksworth in uniform. The Army corporal was shot to death by a white Mississippi police officer in 1962. Courtesy of Cordero Ducksworth and the Syracuse Cold Case Justice Initiative hide caption

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Courtesy of Cordero Ducksworth and the Syracuse Cold Case Justice Initiative
Meriel Jane Waissman/Getty Images

'I'm Petrified For My Children': Will Racism And Guns Lead To America's Ruin?

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